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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Patrice Endres - April 15, 2004 - GA  (Read 6581 times)
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xx Re: Patrice Endres - April 15, 2004 - GA
« Reply #75 on: May 4th, 2005, 9:00pm »

Thank you Jill for this information. I will be watching this in the morning.

My thoughts and prayers are with everyone that is Missing Patrice.
May they get answers and soon.
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xx Husband: Failure to ID suspect 'ludicrous'
« Reply #76 on: May 5th, 2005, 05:24am »

Husband: Failure to ID suspect 'ludicrous'
Missing Cumming woman may have been a victim
By STEPHEN GURR



The husband of a Cumming woman who authorities believe fell victim to a suspected serial killer said the FBI's failure to identify the suspect while he sat in jail before her abduction was "ludicrous."

Patrice Endres' husband, Rob Endres, said Wednesday that the FBI deserved "kudos for coming forward and admitting they made a mistake."

But he said Jeremy Jones never should have been free to kill again, as authorities maintain he was.

"There were two chances to get him and they blew them," Endres said.

"They would have saved the lives of four beautiful women."

Thomas E. Bush, the FBI's assistant director for criminal justice information services, acknowledged this week that the bureau's automated fingerprint identification system failed to "red flag" Jones' prints.

Jones, who is suspected in the deaths of at least five women in four states, spent much of 2003 and 2004 in the Carroll County and Douglas County jails in West Georgia.

He was wanted on a fugitive warrant in Ohio for jumping bond on a rape charge at the time he was jailed for minor offenses in Georgia.

But the system the FBI uses failed to make a match on his fingerprints, Bush said.

Jones later was released and is suspected of committing at least two more murders, including that of Patrice Endres, who went missing in April 2004 and whose body has not been recovered.

Authorities say Jones has confessed to kidnapping and killing the woman and dumping her body in a Douglas County creek.

"The FBI regrets this incident," Bush said. "We continue to improve our procedures and examine new technologies to upgrade and enhance the reliability and accuracy of (the system)."

Georgia arrest procedures call for local law enforcement agencies to submit fingerprints to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, which in turn gives them to the FBI.

The prints are compared against a computerized database of about 450 million, FBI spokesman Joe Parris said.

A computer system handles the process, with human examiners no longer scrutinizing the prints.

"The fingerprint was presented through AFIS, and the automated system failed to make the match," Parris said. "Nobody did anything wrong, nobody was derelict in their duties.

"This was not a botched fingerprint match. This was the AFIS system operating within its expected error range."

Parris said the system had a margin of error of about 5 percent. "Nobody did anything wrong, the system just failed to make the match, with admittedly tragic consequences."

Rob Endres said he hopes the FBI investigates the reasons for the system's failure.

"An apology is great, but find the problem and fix it," he said.

"We rely on these people, and we can't continue to have failures."
http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/stories/20050505/localnews/100851.shtml
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xx Murder victiims' families outraged over FBI mistak
« Reply #77 on: May 5th, 2005, 09:35am »

By DON PLUMMER

Family members of women believed to have been murdered by a suspected serial killer are outraged that the FBI bungled several fingerprint tests, allowing the suspect to be released from jail and allegedly commit four murders.

Jeremy Brian Jones, 32, is suspected by authorities in Georgia and elsewhere of having committed more than 20 murders dating to 1996.

Four of those killings took place, authorities suspect, after Jones was released from jails in Douglas and Carroll counties because the FBI failed to match his fingerprints with those on file in the bureau's national database.

A proper fingerprint match would have kept Jones in jail, FBI officials in Washington acknowledged Tuesday. They declined to offer specifics of how the mistakes were made.

Rob Endres, the husband of Forsyth County hairdresser Patrice Endres, whom police said Jones admitted to killing in April 2004, said such a lapse is unacceptable, especially with the growing threat of terrorism.

"One failure cost four lives. One failure again, if it's the wrong person, could cost hundreds of lives," Endres said Wednesday. "Patrice was just it as far as I'm concerned, and I owe it to her to find out how this could have happened."

Between October 2003 and June 2004, Jones was arrested three times in Georgia — twice in Douglas County and once in Carroll County — for minor offenses. He was jailed each time under the name he gave authorities, John Paul Chapman.

After each arrest, his fingerprints were sent to the FBI lab in Clarksburg, W.Va., but the bureau's computer system didn't match the prints to Jones. Yet his fingerprints had been in the FBI's database since he jumped bail in Oklahoma, where he faced charges of two counts of rape and two counts of sodomy in 2000.

When the computer failed to match the first set of prints, FBI officials said, the prints were given a new file number. After each arrest, the prints sent to the FBI were matched to the newly created file, not to Jones' file.

Beyond saying that the initial missed match was caused by the computer, FBI officials declined to provide information on why the other sets of prints never hit the original file.

FBI officials said their investigation of the problem is ongoing.

Technology failed before

It's not clear how often such mistakes happen, but Simon Cole, a professor at the University of California-Irvine who specializes in science technology, has raised questions about the accuracy of fingerprint evidence.

While researching his 2001 book, "Suspect Identities," Cole said, he discovered at least two other cases in which people charged with murders eluded detection by fingerprint.

In 1994 and in 1995 automated fingerprint systems in New York City failed to identify felons who went on to commit murder, Cole said.

Are there others? Cole said his study of automated fingerprint systems leads him to believe there are.

In Jones' case, authorities didn't discover his true identity until after a fourth woman had been killed in September 2004. Lisa Nichols, 44, was raped, shot and set on fire in her bathroom in Mobile.

Jones has been charged with killing three women: Kathryn Collins, a prostitute whose body was found in New Orleans on Feb. 14, 2004; Amanda Greenwell, a Douglas County woman whose body was found in April 2004; and Nichols. He is also suspected of killing Endres.

Jones is being held in the Mobile County Jail in Alabama on a murder charge in Nichols' slaying. He was indicted in that case Monday, and no trial date has been set.

On Wednesday, Nichols' daughter said the conclusion that her mother's death could have been avoided was as shocking as her murder.

"My God, my mother could have been alive if they had just done their jobs," Jennifer Murphy said from her home near Mobile.

"We just couldn't believe something like that could happen," she said. "We want answers as to why he was able to slip through the system."

Thomas E. Bush III, FBI official in charge of fingerprint analysis, said in a statement issued Tuesday that the agency regrets the error.

Since the mistake was brought to the bureau's attention, he said, technicians in charge of the database — called the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System — have been conducting "regular audits to avoid a repeat of the incident."

An FBI spokesman declined to give details on what was being done to troubleshoot the system but said he was unaware of any other cases such as Jones' — where a felon was mistakenly released and then is alleged to have committed murders after being set free.

No information was made available from the FBI on the percentage of errors the IAFIS system experiences.

"IAFIS is queried more than 50,000 times each day by law enforcement agencies around the world," Bush said. "Although IAFIS is extremely reliable and its successes have far outnumbered its shortcomings, in rare instances the system fails to make a match between a new submission and the existing record.

"It is important to note that this incident was a result of a technical database error, not a human examiner failing to make an appropriate match," Bush said.

IAFIS is a national electronic fingerprint and criminal history database maintained by the FBI and which stores fingerprints taken from crime scenes and from suspects and defendants booked into jails and prisons.

The FBI calls IAFIS "the largest biometric database in the world, containing the fingerprints and corresponding criminal history information for more than 47 million subjects."

In use since 1999, the system is credited with reducing the turnaround time for matching fingerprints, the FBI says. In addition to being used in criminal investigations, the IAFIS system also compares more than 200 million prints on file to people entering the military and applying for sensitive civilian and government jobs.

Regardless of how large the database — or how accurate the technology might be — family members of women killed after the fingerprinting mistakes want answers.

Richard Greenwell's daughter, Amanda, was abducted and killed in Douglas County in March 2004, six weeks after Jones was mistakenly released from the Carroll County Jail, where he had been held for two days on criminal trespass charges.

Learning that Jones may have killed his 16-year-old daughter after being released because of a technical glitch was "numbing," Greenwell said.

"It's just one blow after another," Greenwell said. "It's disturbing. I hope they get something fixed about it."
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xx Suspected serial killer also angry over FBI finger
« Reply #78 on: May 6th, 2005, 11:10pm »

Suspected serial killer also angry over FBI fingerprint mistakes
By STAFF AND WIRE SERVICES


Suspected serial killer Jeremy Bryan Jones says he regrets that the FBI failed to match his fingerprints to an Oklahoma case when he was arrested three times in Georgia on minor charges.

Jones, 32, is charged in three killings that occurred after the FBI didn't match his Oklahoma prints with those taken in jails in Douglas and Carroll counties.

"I wish they had found them," Jones told the Mobile Register in a phone interview from the Mobile County jail Thursday. "I would have been extradited back to Oklahoma and maybe stand trial for rape. It would have been nothing."

Jones added his voice to those earlier this week of family members of the four women authorities say he killed who said they are angry that an FBI computer glitch resulted in Jones being mistakenly released three times.

If the FBI fingerprint system had worked properly, Jones said Thursday, he "never would have been labeled a serial killer."

Jones, 32, said he has killed no one and has denied confessing to any killing, as some authorities have said.

Forsyth County Sheriff Ted Paxton said that in January, Jones admitted to the slaying of Patrice Endres, a 38-year-old hairdresser who disappeared April 15, 2004.

Jones said he thinks the FBI's mix-up occurred because Oklahoma authorities used an inkpad and cards to record his prints. In Georgia, Jones said, his prints were taken using the newer Automatic Fingerprint Identification System, which scans fingerprints and stores them in a nationwide computer system.

The FBI issued a statement Tuesday that blamed a database error for the fingerprint mistake, saying it was not a case of an examiner failing to make an appropriate match.

Jones assumed the identity of Missouri prison inmate John Paul Chapman prior to his being arrested three times in Douglas and Carroll counties. Jones also was using Chapman's Social Security number. Jones' identity was discovered after his arrest in Mobile.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/0505/07jones.html
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xx Re: Patrice Endres - April 15, 2004 - GA
« Reply #79 on: May 8th, 2005, 9:19pm »

Happy Mother's Day, Patrice!
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xx Patrice Endres on Inside Edition Tonight
« Reply #80 on: May 10th, 2005, 4:27pm »

The families that have lived through the aftermath of Jeremy Jones, including Patrice's husband Rob Endres will be on Inside Edition tonight. Times may vary and I will give you the listings chart below. I apologize for the short notice but they didnt notify us until about an hour ago. I hope you all can see this.

http://www.insideedition.com/listings.htm
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xx Life of deceit finally caught up to murder suspect
« Reply #81 on: May 16th, 2005, 09:27am »

By DON PLUMMER
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Published on: 05/13/05


For five years, suspected serial killer Jeremy Brian Jones lived, worked and found romance under an assumed identity.

Friends and lovers — and the police — knew him as John Paul Chapman.

If it hadn't been for his bravado and a little bit of luck, Jones might still be living free under the name of Chapman, perhaps in an apartment in New Orleans or a trailer in Douglas County.

Instead, the 32-year-old drifter is in the Mobile County Jail in Alabama on charges he killed Lisa Nichols, a 44-year-old Alabama woman. Police suspect Jones killed more than 20 other women, including three in metro Atlanta, since 1996.

In the end, a routine police teletype, an alert clerk at a Missouri prison and a series of telephone calls — including one Jones made to detectives who were looking for him — unraveled his secret life.

His case attracted national attention after FBI officials told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on May 3 that a glitch in the agency's fingerprint database allowed Jones to be mistakenly released from jail before Nichols and three other women were murdered.

The revelation prompted outrage from relatives of the women believed to have been killed by Jones.

It has shone a spotlight on a man remembered by his girlfriend, Vicki Freeman, as caring, considerate and loving.

And it has raised a spell-binding question:

After so long, after so many missed opportunities, how did authorities finally catch him?

Interesting nickname

Lisa Nichols lived in Chunchula, Ala., a town of 4,500 people about 300 miles from Atlanta.

On Sept. 18, 2004, family members found Nichols, a divorced mother of two daughters, dead in her bathroom. She had been raped, shot three times in the head, then set on fire.

From the beginning, neighbors were helpful. One remembered seeing a vehicle parked outside Nichols' home; another recalled part of the license tag number.

Quickly, the evidence led police to a man known as "Oklahoma."

One man, who remembered employing "Oklahoma" as a laborer, gave police the man's full name as he knew it — John Paul Chapman. He also provided authorities with a Social Security number and a birth date.

Now, police had a suspect.

Four days later, Paul Burch, the lead detective investigating Nichols' murder, got a call on his cellphone.

It was Jones, posing as John Paul Chapman.

Burch was stunned — and kept talking while his partner, Detective Mitch McRae, began tracing the call.

As the minutes ticked by, Burch kept his suspect on the phone, talking about anything that came to mind, even the weather.

Twenty minutes later, sheriff's deputies surrounded the suspect, who was inside a house one street away from where Nichols had been killed. He was still chatting with Burch on the telephone.

Police charged their captive with capital murder, rape, burglary and kidnapping in Nichols' death.

Still, authorities had no idea of his true identity — or the other horrible crimes of which he is now accused.

Glitch in database

As a matter of course, Burch had the suspect's fingerprints run through the FBI's database, known as the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.

The database holds more than 200 million sets of prints, and is queried more than 50,000 times each day by law enforcement agencies around the world.

When Burch's department ran the fingerprints through the database, the prints came back to the John Paul Chapman alias he had been using — even though Jones' fingerprints had been in the database since 2000, when he skipped bail in Oklahoma after being charged with two counts of rape and two counts of sodomy.

Clearly, the FBI would later say, there was a glitch with the database.

The Mobile attempt was the fourth time the database failed to match Jones' true identity to his original prints — a mistake police say had deadly consequences.

Between October 2003 and June 2004, Jones, posing as John Paul Chapman, was arrested three times in Georgia — twice in Douglas County, once in Carroll County — on minor offenses.

Authorities in both counties sent his fingerprints to the FBI, but the computer system never made a match. Had the match been made, local authorities say, Jones would have remained in jail.

Instead, the man who called himself John Paul Chapman was released, and police say he killed four more women:

• Katherine Collins, whose body was found in New Orleans on Feb. 14, 2004.

• Amanda Greenwell, a 16-year-old Douglas County girl whose body was found in April 2004.

• Patrice Endres, a Forsyth County hairdresser who vanished on April 15, 2004.

• Nichols, found slain in her Alabama mobile home last fall.

Jones has been charged in the deaths of Collins, Greenwell and Nichols. He is a suspect, police say, in the Endres slaying.

In response to queries by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the FBI admitted that a mistake occurred with its database and is now checking the database to make sure it's working properly.

Had Jones been arrested in Mobile on a minor offense — as he had been before, in Georgia — he likely would have been released again.

This time, facing murder, rape and other charges in Nichols' death, the suspect was held without bond.

And that's when authorities encountered a bit of luck.

Telltale phone call

After the arrest, detectives in Mobile sent out a national teletype, as they routinely do in major crimes.

Perhaps, they thought, their man might be a suspect in other cases.

They weren't sure they'd hear back from any other law enforcement agencies. But they did, and that response added yet another wrinkle to the case.

Officials from Missouri said they knew of a John Paul Chapman with the same Social Security number and birth date. But that man was in their prison, and had been since 1999.

Missouri officials sent along a picture and fingerprints of their John Paul Chapman.

The two sets of fingerprints didn't match.

Over the next week, Burch and other detectives looked for any missing detail.

As they worked, the suspect provided them with yet another break.

The man they arrested as John Paul Chapman made several telephone calls from the jail's pay phone to a number in Oklahoma.

Detectives traced the number to a woman living in Miami, Okla.

John Koch, a detective in Miami, told authorities in Mobile he was familiar with the woman and knew there were several outstanding warrants for her son.

Her son's name?

Jeremy Brian Jones.

Koch sent Jones' photos and fingerprints to Mobile. This time, said Marvin Whitfield, a crime scene investigator with the Mobile County Sheriff's Office, the prints matched their prisoner.

Koch also faxed Mobile the outstanding warrants.

Authorities won't say how Jones obtained Chapman's identity. But as Jones sat in jail, they presented a "very surprised" murder suspect with the outstanding warrants.

Jones' killing spree, police said, had ended.

And they finally knew the true identity of the man they had in jail.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/0505/13jones.html
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xx Re: Patrice Endres - April 15, 2004 - GA
« Reply #82 on: Jun 6th, 2005, 11:04am »

Patrice is now listed with NAMPN website. You may the link by clicking below:

http://www.nampn.doenetwork.us/cases/endres_patrice.html
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xx Jeremy Jones denies killings in several states
« Reply #83 on: Jun 16th, 2005, 05:30am »

Serial killing suspect Jeremy Bryan Jones denied killing anyone and said during a television interview aired Wednesday night that authorities in several states have made up alleged confessions.

"How am I in jail? Wrong place, wrong time," Jones told WGCL-TV in Atlanta in a telephone interview from the Mobile County Jail in Alabama, where he faces capital murder charges in the Sept. 18 death of Lisa Marie Nichols, 45, of Turnerville. The victim's body was burned in a rural mobile home near Mobile.

Jones cited the case of missing metro Atlanta hairdresser Patrice Endres, who disappeared mysteriously on April 15, 2004, in Forsyth County. Earlier this year, authorities there said Jones confessed to killing her and dumping her body in a creek.

"Patrice Endres. I was on the time clock working at Lafarge Rock Quarry in Douglasville. They have records of that. That's why they haven't charged me," Jones told the television station.

The Oklahoma man at first acknowledged having familiarity with one of the crime scenes he has been linked to by authorities _ in the Nichols case.

"That's the only case I've ever been around and seen anything with a fire or anything like that," he said.

Then, he backed off, saying that police had shown him pictures of a fire.

Jones admitting knowing some of the victims, but only as acquaintances who took drugs with him.

Jones is charged with killing a 16-year-old girl in Douglas County, Ga., who was reported missing in March 2004. He also is charged with a Louisiana murder and has been named a suspect in at least two other slayings in Georgia, two in Oklahoma and one in Missouri.
http://www.accessnorthga.com/news/ap_newfullstory.asp?ID=61826
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xx Suspected serial killer denies killing Cumming wom
« Reply #84 on: Jun 16th, 2005, 09:55am »

ATLANTA - Serial killing suspect Jeremy Bryan Jones denied killing anyone and said during a television interview aired Wednesday night that authorities in several states have made up alleged confessions.

``How am I in jail? Wrong place, wrong time,'' Jones told WGCL-TV in Atlanta in a telephone interview from the Mobile County Jail in Alabama, where he faces capital murder charges in the Sept. 18 death of Lisa Marie Nichols, 45, of Turnerville. The victim's body was burned in a rural mobile home near Mobile.
http://www.accessnorthga.com/news/hall/newfullstory.asp?ID=93415
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xx Defense: Serial killing suspect's confessions 'dru
« Reply #85 on: Aug 8th, 2005, 10:55am »

MOBILE, ALABAMA - Lawyers for suspected serial killer Jeremy Jones, the man suspected in the death of a Cumming hairdresser, say his alleged confessions were drug influenced.

Jeremy Jones is being held in a Mobile, Alabama jail, charged with the murder of Lisa Nichols there. Jones is also the prime suspect in the murder of 38-year-old Patrice Endres of Cumming in April of last year.

Defense attorney Habib Yazdi said Jones was administered the drug Risperdal, used to treat bipolar disorder, between September and November 2004. and that their client's multiple alleged confessions may have stemmed from the unprescribed, jail-issued medication.

The defense will argue in an Aug. 12 court hearing that anything Jones said while under the drug's influence should be suppressed, Yazdi said.

``He could not make a decision to waive his rights and talk'' while taking the medication, Yazdi said.

Alabama Assistant Attorney General Don Valeska, whose office is prosecuting Jones, said he is aware of Yazdi's claims.

``We will address the matter in court,'' Valeska said.

Jones is currently being held in Mobile County Metro Jail, charged with the murder of Nichols, a Turnerville, Alabama resident . Her mutilated and badly burned body was found in her mobile home in September 2004.

Authorities say Jones has confessed to the murder several times, and at least one of those confessions came before the drug was allegedly administered. Jones has denied confessing.

Yazdi said he learned of the medication after an anonymous call to the office of federal defender Carlos Williams, who is representing Jones on federal charges of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Williams obtained a federal court order to get Jones' medical records from the jail, and Yazdi and his co-counsel, Greg Hughes, also received the records, Yazdi said.

Williams has declined comment on the matter.

According to Yazdi, the medical files show that Jones became ill while at the jail. The attending physician noted that he had not prescribed Risperdal and, if anyone had done so, the administration of the medication should be stopped, Yazdi said.

Hughes said the defense was continuing to review and evaluate the records, but he believed the medication's role could hold great significance.

``We think it could have a major impact on this case and whatever other cases are out there,'' Hughes said.

Jones has also been charged with killing a teenage girl in Georgia and a woman in New Orleans. Authorities have said he confessed to or is being investigated in the deaths of a couple and the disappearance of two teenage girls in Oklahoma.

Yazdi has previously argued in court that Jones may be mentally ill or may have suffered brain damage after going into comas following two drug overdoses.
http://www.accessnorthga.com/news/hall/newfullstory.asp?ID=94831
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xx Prosecution witness suspect for Forsyth County dis
« Reply #86 on: Aug 28th, 2005, 8:09pm »

MOBILE - A prosecution witness against capital murder suspect Jeremy Jones was found dead at a residence in Chunchula, Alabama.

The body of William Donald ``Scooter'' Coleman Junior, 39, was found Thursday by a family member.

A Mobile County sheriff's department statement today said there were no signs of foul play. The cause of death remains under investigation by the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences.

Coleman was expected to testify in the October 17th trial of Jones in the death of Lisa Nichols, 45, who was raped and burned. She was found dead inside her home in Mobile County last September.

Jones is said to have kidnapped and killed Forsyth County hairdresser Patrice Endres. Her body have never been found.

Besides Nichols, Jones is charged with killing a teenage girl in Georgia and a woman in Louisiana.

In Georgia, Jones is charged with murdering Amanda Greenwell, a 16-year-old neighbor in Douglasville, whose remains were found in April 2004. And in the prime suspect in the Endres disappearance.

Authorities have said Jones confessed or is being investigated in the deaths of a couple and the disappearance of two teenage girls in Oklahoma, plus the killing of another woman in Georgia.

Jones, a native of Oklahoma, could be sentenced to death if convicted.
http://www.accessnorthga.com/news/hall/newfullstory.asp?ID=95533
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xx Re: Patrice Endres - April 15, 2004 - GA
« Reply #87 on: Sep 3rd, 2005, 10:01pm »

Thursday night mom and I passed the hair salon on HWY 369 on the way to Sue Ann Ray's vigil in Canton. I remembered the day Patrice was abducted from that little building as we passed. It is now a pet grooming business. I thought about Patrice all night while we were at Sue Ann's vigil and wondered how long it would be before we find her.
Will we ever find justice for what is believed to have happened that day? I stopped by the BP station after Sue Ann's vigil and bought one of those single roses that quick stops have. On the way home, I just stopped in the parking lot and laid the rose on the parking lot. I feel so helpless not knowing what else to do for Patrice.
I know that somehow she knows that I still look search for her and think about her all the time. Sometimes it's so hard to deal with the reality of what we do. God will give us all strength to carry out this continued search not only for Patrice, but all people who are out there missing.

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xx Why Cant We Find Patrice?
« Reply #88 on: Sep 30th, 2005, 1:55pm »

Why Can’t We Find Patrice?
A family’s agony continues…

October 15, 2005 marks a year and a half since Patrice Endres was abducted in broad daylight from her hair salon in Cumming, GA. Since that time, her family has had to wait and wonder what really went wrong that day and when this nightmare would end.

In early 2005, authorities revealed that the person responsible for Patrice’s disappearance and then murder was a man named Jeremy Jones. Jones was an unregistered sex offender who slipped through the cracks and was able to get out of jail and leave a trail of destruction. He is said to have murdered at least four women and suspected in several other cases from Oklahoma all the way to Georgia. What’s more troubling about this case is that part of the reason Jeremy Jones was able to do these horrible crimes, particularly Patrice’s case, was because of FBI mishandling.

While we can excuse some things and understand mistakes happen, there are other obstacles that are impossible to understand, let alone accept. Once it was determined that Jones had abducted Patrice that fateful day, DNA was to be extracted from Jones’ Jeep to see if there was any trace of Patrice. Although Patrice’s fate was now known, this might possibly bring some much needed justice. The FBI has had almost a year to complete the tests but to no avail, they have made no attempts to even begin work on Jones’ Jeep.

In the meantime, those Patrice left behind that day are still left with the horror of knowing what happened to Patrice that day (from Jeremy Jones’ confession), her body’s final resting place (a cold watery grave somewhere in the Chattahoochee river), and the fact that nobody is making an effort to locate her.

Patrice was a loving mother and wife. She had so many things that any normal person would want. How could she have known that day she went into work at her salon that this could happen? How could we have stopped this? Better yet, why doesn’t anybody want to do anything to help Patrice? These are the same people who allowed a dangerous criminal out to roam the streets and find his way to Patrice (an innocent victim).

I am frustrated that our government and our society can allow a huge mistake like this to happen but yet they cannot go back and at least try to fix where it went wrong. Why can’t we find Patrice and why can’t she have the justice she so deserves?



Just my thoughts
Jill Bennett

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xx Re: Patrice Endres - April 15, 2004 - GA
« Reply #89 on: Oct 15th, 2005, 8:10pm »

Thinking of Patrice on this one year and six month anniversary since her disappearance. Hoping for answers soon.

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Caring About All Missing & Murdered People
Please visit www.FindCarrieCulberson.Com
And www.AngelGardenOfHope.Com
My group inspired to help others because of Carrie.
See also our missing & murdered person blog
http://findcarrie.blogspot.com
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