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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Brooke Wilberger - May 24, 2004 - OR  (Read 4316 times)
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xx Kim's lawyer wants access to evidence
« Reply #15 on: Nov 18th, 2004, 08:07am »

CORVALLIS - The lawyer for a man accused of stealing women's underwear from dormitories and apartments has requested a hearing on disclosing investigators' evidence to the defense.
Des Connall, who represents Sung Koo Kim, indicated in Benton County Circuit Court this week that he is interested in seeing what's on several computer drives seized by investigators last spring.

Kim, 30, faces charges of theft and burglary in Benton County, as well as similar charges in Multnomah, Yamhill and Washington counties, plus charges of possessing child pornography and encouraging child sex abuse.

He also is considered a significant person of interest in the case of Brooke Wilberger, of Veneta, who disappeared May 24. Police say they found on Kim's computer 40,000 pictures of women being tortured and raped, as well as a document that describes the rape, torture and mutilation of a woman titled osu.doc.

Police say that Kim had been researching biographical information about a female Oregon State University swimmer who was scheduled to move into the Oak Park Apartments, where Wilberger vanished, in late May.

In addition, Kim's computer allegedly showed he'd done multiple Internet searches on ``non-extraditable countries,'' countries that won't send a person back to the United States for prosecution.

Connall said he wants to see copies of the contents of three hard drives found in Kim's computer, a hard drive found in his closet and one from his laptop. Oregon statutes require prosecution and defense attorneys to share with each other all information that is to be presented as evidence at the trial.

Chief Deputy District Attorney John Haroldson argued Connall's request was too broad, that he was asking for information that relates to the Wilberger investigation and not just to the charges Kim is currently facing in Benton County. The pending charges stand alone, he said, and do not relate to Wilberger.

Benton County Circuit Judge Janet Holcomb scheduled a hearing on Connall's discovery motion for Dec. 8.

Release hearings have been scheduled in all four counties in which Kim faces charges Nov. 19 in Multnomah County; Nov. 24 in Yamhill County; Nov. 30 in Washington County; and Dec. 17 in Benton County.

Kim's bail totals $15.1 million.

http://www.registerguard.com/news/2004/11/11/d2.or.kim.1111.html
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xx The Search For Brooke Continues
« Reply #16 on: Nov 24th, 2004, 09:42am »

Half a year after disappearance, the hunt for 19-year-old continues

By BECKY WALDROP
Gazette-Times reporter

Six months ago today, Brooke Wilberger stood outside the Oak Park Apartments, cleaning rag and bucket in hand.

It was a sunny spring morning, and she had just started cleaning lampposts at the complex managed by her sister and brother-in-law. Brooke was on summer break from Brigham Young University, where she had just finished her freshman year.

Brooke was busy wiping away spiderwebs and dirt when her sister left to run an errand.

And then she was gone.

All that was left were a pair of flip-flop sandals, the bucket and the rag.

Hundreds of volunteers from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Benton County Search and Rescue and local law enforcement agencies launched a search. In the coming weeks, thousands of acres were combed without finding a trace of the missing woman.

Police thought then, and continue to believe today, that someone abducted Brooke Wilberger.

The case has grown hot when new leads are discovered, then cold when they don't pan out.

But even though six months have passed, the story of the beautiful young woman from Veneta who disappeared has held the attention of many people who still wait for her return.

The image of the smiling 19-year-old with blond hair and blue eyes still looks out from storefront windows and billboards around Corvallis. The ink on the missing person fliers has faded, but police and the Wilberger family believe that someone knows what happened.

And with donations raised through a recent pink bracelet campaign, the family was able to not only order more of the wrist-size reminders but also to double the reward offered for any information that leads to the location of Brooke Wilberger.

Lt. Ron Noble of the Corvallis Police Department has been the public face of the investigation, accommodating interview requests from journalists reporting the latest angle in the case at least once a week.

Noble still meets regularly with Greg Wilberger, Brooke's father, and had lunch with him Tuesday. The Wilbergers are increasing the reward for any information that leads to Brooke's location in hopes that it might prompt someone to contact the police.

It could be that only one person knows what happened to her, Noble said.

"But we're still looking for that tip to give us the one break in the case," he said.

Six months may seem like a long time for a person to be missing. But the family and investigators find hope in the story of Elizabeth Smart, the Utah teen who was found nine months after she disappeared.

"It was a different scenario and different circumstance, and I know the likelihood of this being a similar incident isn't great," Noble said. "But it's something they have to hold onto. It's not outside the realm of possibilities."

The hardest part for many people involved in the case has been not knowing what happened.

"The frustration point for us is that we haven't been able to solve it," Noble said.

Other local investigations have played out over time, but nothing of this sustained size or scale.

A task force of Corvallis police detectives, Benton County sheriff's deputies, FBI agents and people from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children continues to work on the case every day.

For some investigators, working on the disappearance is just about their only assignment. The task force has also been assisted by retired law enforcement officers and even a former Benton County district attorney.

Noble said the case has meant so much to some of his detectives that he's had to give them permission to take a vacation.

"It's hard for our detectives to take a day off. They may not be here working, but they are still thinking about it," he said. "I had one detective say, ‘How can I take a vacation? Brooke is still missing.'"

The shock of realizing that a woman could be abducted in broad daylight near a busy intersection without anyone noticing in this town has in some ways changed Corvallis, he said.

The rash of reports of women being attacked and the interest in two people who were considered suspects in the case has also created fear.

Noble said Corvallis isn't any less safe than it was before May 24. In his 17 years with the department, he's seen crime increase and watched it decrease.

"I don't believe (Corvallis) is more dangerous," he said.

He acknowledged that, as a parent, the events of the past six months have made him more cautious and watchful of his own children.

"I'd recommend that with what is going on right now to use the common-sense approach and try to do what you can to be safe," Noble said.

One of the positive things that has come out of the case is how the community has stepped up to offer assistance to others in need. That response has included thousands of volunteer hours, donations to the Brooke Wilberger Foundation and assistance from retired criminal justice workers.

Zak Hansen, Brooke's brother-in-law, said recently that he was amazed at how quickly the first shipment of the pink bracelets sold out. Whenever he sees one on somebody's wrist, it brings him a moment of happiness.

Hansen said more bracelets have been shipped and should be arriving soon.

Even the veteran investigators working the case feel a sense of gratitude for the outpouring of support. As professional as they are about their work, the disappearance of Brooke Wilberger has affected everyone, Noble said.

"This stuff just touches you," he said.

At a glance

Brooke Carol Wilberger, a 19-year-old Brigham Young University student from Veneta, was last seen outside a southwest Corvallis apartment complex May 24. She is 5 feet, 4 inches tall and weighs 105 to 119 pounds. She was last seen wearing a T-shirt with "BYU Soccer" in small print, an indigo "Fresh Jive" sweatshirt, blue jeans and no shoes. She was wearing a ring engraved with the letters CTR, small hoop earrings and possibly a silver watch.

She has a piercing in the top of her right ear and a scar on her right forearm from her wrist to her elbow from a gymnastics accident.

Tipline: 800-843-5678

Web site: The Wilberger family has created a site for tips and information at www.findbrooke.com

Reward fund: A $30,000 reward is being offered for information leading to Brooke Wilberger's safe return. There is a separate $6,000 reward offered by the family for information leading to Brooke's location.

Becky Waldrop covers public policy and education for the Gazette-Times. She can be reached at becky.waldrop@lee.net or 758-9510.

http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/11/24/news/top_story/wed01.txt
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xx Willberger Reward Increased
« Reply #17 on: Nov 25th, 2004, 09:29am »

Brooke Wilberger's family increase reward

11/24/2004
Associated Press

The family of missing coed Brooke Wilberger has increased the reward for valid information on her whereabouts to $6,000, officials announced.

The family has increased the dollar amount in the hopes of encouraging anyone who may know what happened to the Brigham Young University freshman to come forward, said Corvallis Police Lt. Ron Noble. A separate reward is still being offered for the 19-year-old woman's safe return.

Officials believe Wilberger, a Veneta native, was abducted exactly six months ago, on May 24, from the Corvallis apartment complex her sister and brother-in-law managed. She vanished from the complex's parking lot, leaving behind her flip-flops, her purse, cell phone and the bucket of soapy water she was using to clean the light fixtures.

The Corvallis Police Department, with assistance from the FBI and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, is continuing to investigate the circumstances surrounding her disappearance, Noble said.
http://www.kgw.com/sharedcontent/APStories.../D86IB0H86.html
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xx Kim's defense wants all Wilberger documents
« Reply #18 on: Nov 29th, 2004, 10:23am »

Defense may not get records because Kim has not been charged

By JENNIFER NITSON
Gazette-Times reporter

Sung Koo Kim's defense team has submitted a motion to compel discovery in his pending Benton County Circuit Court case — including a request for all documents relating to the investigation of Brooke Wilberger's disappearance.


District Attorney Scott Heiser maintains that the defendant is not entitled to such documents because the 30-year-old Tigard man has not been charged in Wilberger's abduction.

"While we are confident that the defendant would very much like to see what his exposure is, if any, in the Wilberger case, because he has not been charged in that case, he simply is not entitled to inspect or copy any records related to the Wilberger investigation," Heiser wrote in the state's response to the motion, filed with the court Tuesday.

Wilberger disappeared May 24 from the parking lot of the Oak Park Apartments, near the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis. A multi-agency task force has worked virtually nonstop on the case for six months.

Kim was named a "person of interest" in the Wilberger disappearance early on. When Kim was arrested in June in Multnomah County for stealing women's underwear from college dorms and laundry rooms, police seized computer hard drives that reportedly contained thousands of pictures of women being tortured and raped. Police also say they found a computer document titled osu.doc, which appeared to be a checklist describing the rape, torture and mutilation of a woman, as well as records of Internet searches on countries that won't send a person back to the United States for prosecution.

Facing a total of 18 counts of theft, burglary, possession of child pornography and encouraging child sex abuse in Benton, Multnomah, Yamhill and Washington counties, Kim is on his third defense team.

Des Connall of Portland, who began appearing in court on Kim's behalf this fall, is joined by attorneys Shannon Connall and Laura Graser, both of Portland, in defending the case.

In their recent motion they assert that Kim's current security amount, which totals more than $15 million in all counties where he faces charges, is based on the fact that he is a person of interest in Wilberger's disappearance, not the burglary and theft counts.

Heiser responded that Kim should be held without bail because he poses a danger to the community.

"The defendant's threat of sexual victimization to the women he is hunting, and to the community at large, is well evidenced," he wrote.

The defense contends that Kim has committed no violent crime and never posed any threat to the women he stole underwear from.

Thus far the courts have disagreed with that reasoning. At a Wednesday hearing in Yamhill County Circuit Court, the presiding judge turned down a request by the defense to lower Kim's bail there from $4 million to $50,000, stating the defendant is a danger to the community and a flight risk.

Defense team motions and the state's response are scheduled to be heard in Benton County Circuit Court at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 8.

http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/11/26/news/community/friloc04.txt
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xx The Wilbergers Persevere With Faith & Family
« Reply #19 on: Dec 2nd, 2004, 06:00am »

CORVALLIS, Ore. - In some ways, the Wilbergers are like any other large family - getting all six kids, along with their five children, together for just a simple dinner takes planning.

However, Cammy and Greg Wilberger know there are some things you cannot prepare for.

A common thought among Wilberger family members is expressed at a pre-meal prayer by Brooke's father, Greg Wilberger, "We pray that you will bless her wherever she is, comfort her and strengthen her."

For six months, the Wilbergers have been praying - hoping that their 19-year-old daughter, Brooke, would be found.

"It's really difficult because of the unknown. We can't have closure and we don't want closure. We want Brooke home," said Brooke's mother Cammy Wilberger.

However, as the months go by, there are more questions than answers.

"When you go through that numb stage, the next part is realizing you have no control and you are at the mercy of God and police and you can't do anything," Greg said.

It's a feeling of helplessness that most people cannot understand and so the Wilbergers, looking for comfort and strength, rely on each other.

"You make a conscious decision each day to focus on the good that is around and you do that. If you focus on the fact that she's not here with us at this time or on the negative that surrounds you, then you just become negative yourself," Brooke's brother Bryce Wilberger said.

Brooke's sister, Shannon, says there are times when even family cannot ease the pain.

"Like I said, it's those moments when it's quiet and just you… and those memories and those feelings are overwhelming," said Brooke's sister Shannon Wilberger.

That is when the Wilberger family turns to their faith and say they believe they will see Brooke again, they just do not know when.

"But when you feel that you can turn over those heartaches, those questions and those wonderings, then He provides you with a way to go on and let time go on. And we believe we are a family together, or whether we see Brooke here on earth again or in heaven, we will see her and we will be able to be reunited as a family," Shannon said.

In the meantime, the Wilbergers has dedicated a special wooden box to Brooke that family members can put stuff in, like letters, pictures, or even teeth that some of the kids have added.

The box is just one more way the Wilbergers keep hope alive that Brooke will someday come home.

http://www.katu.com/stories/73073.html
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xx Bracelets represent a variety of causes
« Reply #20 on: Dec 7th, 2004, 05:17am »

Some examples of organizations with fund-raiser bracelets, arranged by color:

RED:

- The Diabetes Research Institute is raising funds with its "Insulin Is Not a Cure" bracelets.

- This month, the nonprofit Keep a Child Alive will begin selling bracelets to raise funds for children With HIV/AIDS:

BLUE:

- Sydney Davis and her friend Daniel Rosen, friends from New Jersey who both have juvenile diabetes, are selling bracelets in honor of their 13th birthdays. The bracelets, available at the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center at Columbus-Presbyterian hospital in New York, carry the words "Cure Diabetes Today."

PINK:

- Target stores and Amazon.com are selling the Target Pink Breast Cancer Awareness Bracelet that say, "Share Beauty Spread Hope." Funds go to breast cancer research.

- In Utah, people have been wearing "Find Brooke" bracelets for Brooke Wilberger, a student at Brigham Young University who disappeared in Oregon in May. Proceeds are going to a search-and-rescue fund.

ORANGE:

- The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation has the "MAX-LIFE" fundraising bracelets, named for Max Rowe, a 9-year-old in St. Louis who has the disease.

- The L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center and the San Francisco AIDS Foundation are selling bracelets to raise funds and awareness of their annual AIDS bike ride.

GREEN:

- 7-Eleven stores will soon have bracelets to raise money for the USO, which provides support to members of the military.

ALUMINUM:

- HeroBracelets.org is selling bracelets, each with the name of a soldier killed in Iraq. Proceeds go to the Fallen Heroes Fund.
http://www.telegram.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041206/APN/412060933
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xx Re: Brooke Wilberger - May 24, 2004 - OR
« Reply #21 on: Dec 8th, 2004, 05:20am »

Family distributes another 25,000 reminders of the search for missing woman

By BECKY WALDROP
Gazette-Times reporter

The supply of pink bracelets reminding people of the search for Brooke Wilberger has been replenished, and three Corvallis locations are helping to distribute 25,000 bands stamped with the Web site address and investigation tip line number.

The first order of bracelets sold out in a matter of days as people eagerly shelled out $1 to do something to help find the 19-year-old Veneta woman who vanished from a Corvallis apartment complex in May.

The bracelets are available on campus at the OSU Bookstore, downtown at Peak Sports and at Timberhill Athletic Club in northwest Corvallis.

Jeff Katz, owner of Peak Sports, said the demand for the bracelets hasn't gone away since the first order sold out. The people he's talked to recognize the cause they're helping when they buy a bracelet.

"People don't walk in asking what they are," Katz said. "They're walking in asking where they are."

Zak Hansen, Wilberger's brother-in-law, delivered two large plastic garbage bags and a bulky box filled with 500 of the bracelets to Peak on Tuesday afternoon and planned to make another delivery at Timberhill that night.

If it's anything like the first batch, these bracelets won't last long.

Katz said many people are buying them as gifts for friends, and the trendy wristbands are quite popular with young people. Some people have purchased 10 or more at a time. The family has received bracelet requests from groups, such as a girls' basketball team from Seattle who had heard about the missing woman.

Katz knows Wilberger's Corvallis relatives, and he was happy to be a bracelet distributor. The bands are also being sold at several locations in Portland and in Utah, where Wilberger attended college at Brigham Young University.

Hansen said the money from the sale of the first 25,000 bracelets paid to make more of them. Although proceeds go to the Brooke Wilberger Foundation search and rescue fund, Hansen said the intent of the pink bracelet campaign is to raise awareness about the case, not money.

In the days following his sister-in-law's apparent abduction, Hansen said he couldn't believe that something like this could happen in Corvallis. Seeing people assist in the search, and now wearing the bracelets, reminded him that the community is a good place.

"It put me at ease," he said.

In addition to keeping the unsolved disappearance in the public mind, the bracelets carry another message, Hansen said. Since Wilberger vanished, there have been other reports of attempted abductions and assaults against local women.

"It's a reminder to be careful," Hansen said. "This world can be a rough place."

ON THE NET: www.findbrooke.com

http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/12/08/news/community/wedloc01.txt
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xx Kim denied Wilberger files
« Reply #22 on: Dec 9th, 2004, 06:57am »

Sung Koo Kim and his defense team will not get information related to the Brooke Wilberger investigation, the Benton County Circuit Court decided Wednesday, while the chief deputy district attorney maintained that Kim has never been charged with Wilberger's disappearance.

Defense attorney Des Connall of Portland repeatedly brought up issues of bail and the release of his client during the proceedings, and he was reminded several times by the judge that the intention of the hearing was to discuss the discovery of evidence.

Connall asserted that he needed to know immediately whether the state will be requesting no bail while at the same time withholding information relating to Wilberger.

"If the court considers Brooke Wilberger's disappearance in setting bail, the state must provide Brooke Wilberger investigative information as discovery in this case," Connall said.

Chief Deputy District Attorney John Haroldson stated that the burglary and theft charges Kim faces in Benton County are not related to the disappearance of Wilberger.

He asked Judge Janet Holcomb to strike any reference he made in previous court hearings to Wilberger and the coincidences regarding her disappearance and Kim's charges, and to refrain from considering Wilberger's case as a factor in upcoming release hearings.

Kim, 30, faces three counts of theft and two counts of burglary in Benton County for allegedly stealing women's underwear from dorms and apartment laundry rooms. One such laundry facility was at the Oak Park Apartments, where Wilberger vanished May 24.

With a total of 18 counts of theft, burglary, possession of child pornography and encouraging child sex abuse pending against him in four counties, Kim faces a total bail amount of $15 million.

Connall, like the two defense teams that came before him in the Kim case, says this is exorbitant and unfair given the charges. District attorneys in Benton, Multnomah, Washington and Yamhill counties say Kim is a dangerous offender, and they have pushed for higher bail amounts or denial of bail altogether.

On Nov. 24 a Yamhill County Circuit Court judge agreed with prosecutors and refused to lower Kim's $4 million bail in that county, stating Kim is a danger to the community and a flight risk.

Connall submitted to the Benton County court Wednesday a copy of an e-mail sent by a Yamhill County prosecutor to a Multnomah County prosecutor that purportedly outlined a plan to keep Kim in jail.

"We need to do all we can to get as many burglaries on him as possible," the e-mail said.

Holcomb accepted the evidence but said it had nothing to do with discovery and that it would be more appropriate to address it at the upcoming release hearing on Dec. 17, when Kim is scheduled to appear in person.
http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/12/09/news/community/thuloc03.txt
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xx Kim's family files lawsuit against police
« Reply #23 on: Dec 10th, 2004, 05:53am »

They say police used force in search; he's a person of interest in Wilberger case

By the Associated Press

TIGARD — Family members of an Oregon man who has been publicly named as a suspect in the disappearance of a Brigham Young University student said they plan to file a civil rights lawsuit against police.

KGW-TV, the NBC affiliate in Portland, reported that the tort claim notice filed by the family of Sung Koo Kim alleges that an Oregon State Police SWAT team and other law enforcement used excessive force when they searched the Kims' Tigard home last May.

Agencies named as defendants include Oregon State Police, the Benton County Sheriff's Office, the Tigard police department and the Newberg police department.

Representatives for each of the agencies declined comment about the family's claim, citing the ongoing investigation of Kim and because of pending litigation.

The Tigard home was searched as part of an investigation into Kim's alleged theft of thousands of pairs of women's underwear from local college campuses. Police said they also found an arsenal of weapons inside the house.

Kim, 30, faces charges of theft and burglary in Benton County, as well as similar charges in Multnomah, Yamhill and Washington counties, plus charges of possessing child pornography and encouraging child sex abuse.

He has been named as a suspect in the disappearance of Brooke Wilberger, a 19-year-old BYU student who is originally from the Eugene area. She disappeared on May 24 from her sister's Corvallis apartment complex.

Kim's bail has been set at $15 million.

He has pleaded innocent to the charges.
http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/12/10/news/oregon/friore01.txt
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xx Albany man set free and cleared of Brooke ...
« Reply #24 on: Dec 10th, 2004, 7:52pm »

PORTLAND, Ore. - An Albany man who assaulted an Oregon State University student pleaded guilty and was released from jail Friday afternoon.
Aaron Evans, 21, pleaded guilty in Benton County to felony Attempted Sexual Abuse in the First Degree, First-Degree Public Indecency and Menacing involving an attack of a woman on the OSU campus Sept. 29.

According to a female college student, a man emerged from some bushes and tried to grab her while she was walking.

The woman was not hurt in the attempted abduction, but police later arrested Evans after a report from a citizen helped them track him down.

Benton County Chief Deputy District Attorney John Haroldson said that Evans was released from jail because he had already served more than the 60 days of jail required by the court in the settlement hearing Friday.

But Haroldson said Evans' felony status should be a warning to the public.

"Any time that someone stands convicted of a felony sexual crime involving forcible compulsion, there is cause for public concern," Haroldson said.

Even though Haroldson said that "Law enforcement investigation followed up on the 'Brooke Wilberger' leads and found there was no link (to Evans)."

Lt. Ron Noble from the Corvallis Police Department told KATU that Evans continues to be a person of interest in the disappearance of Brigham Young University student Brooke Wilberger.

Evans will be in court again in Linn County on Dec. 15 for reckless driving, which is a Class A Misdemeanor.
http://katu.com/stories/73323.html

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xx Re: Brooke Wilberger - May 24, 2004 - OR
« Reply #25 on: Dec 18th, 2004, 07:37am »

posting for findcarrie (bb)

Kim's bail

raised to

$1 million

By Jennifer Nitson

For the Democrat-Herald

CORVALLIS — After hearing arguments by state and defense attorneys, Benton County Circuit Judge Janet Holcomb denied a motion to reduce bail for accused panty thief Sung Koo Kim Friday — deciding instead to raise his Benton County security from $100,000 to $1 million.

With 18 counts of burglary, theft, possession of child pornography and encouraging child sex abuse in four counties pending against him, Kim now faces a total bail of $16.1 million.

Though Kim, 30, is considered a "significant person of interest" in the suspected abduction of Brooke Wilberger, who disappeared from a Corvallis apartment complex last May, Holcomb methodically struck any reference to the missing 19-year-old woman from the court record before she made her judgment.

Kim's mother, Dong Kim of Tigard, was called to the stand to testify about the family's ability to post large amounts of bail. Dong Kim stated that she only had $30,000 which she could use to pay bail.

Chief Deputy District Attorney John Haroldson pointed out that Dong Kim had posted more than $100,000 for Sung Koo Kim's release in May from the Yamhill County Jail.

"I was prepared," Dong Kim replied. "I was prepared for bail."

On cross-examination, defense attorney Des Connall pointed out that all of the money returned to her from Yamhill County had been spent — mostly on legal fees.

Haroldson urged that Sung Koo Kim be denied the option of bail altogether, based on the potential danger he represents to community.

He submitted to the court several images, taken from a collection of more than 40,000 images of women being raped, tortured and mutilated reportedly found on Sung Koo Kim's computer drives during a search of his home last spring.

A pretrial hearing in Kim's case was scheduled for 8:30 a.m. Jan. 28.

http://www.dhonline.com/articles/2004/12/18/news/local/news05.txt
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xx Kim bail raised to $16 million
« Reply #26 on: Dec 19th, 2004, 08:52am »

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CORVALLIS - A bail face-off Friday in Benton County Circuit Court saved alleged panty thief Sung Koo Kim from being denied the opportunity to post security.

The prosecution asked that Judge Janet Holcolm order Kim held without bail - a status usually reserved for treason or murder suspects. She refused.

However, Holcolm raised the Benton County portion of Kim's bail from $100,000 to $1 million, and that figures to ensure the same end result - that Kim will remain lodged before and during the various proceedings he is facing in four Willamette Valley counties.

Among the four counties -Benton, Yamhill, Multnomah and Washington - the 30-year-old Tigard resident is now being held on a combined bail of $16 million. His family would have to post $1.6 million to secure his release, but says it has already exhausted its assets in order to provide him with a top-notch trial lawyer.

Kim is awaiting trial on 51 counts of burglary and theft, involving thousands of pairs of panties and bras reportedly discovered neatly cataloged in the home he shared with his parents and adult sister. In his home Washington County, he also faces 16 counts of encouraging child sexual abuse, involving images of child pornography reportedly discovered among about 40,000 images of women being raped, tortured and mutilated.

While the state argued Friday for no bail, Kim's high-profile Portland defense lawyer, Des Connall, argued for a "reasonable" bail - one within reach of his close-knit and highly supportive family. Both sides felt the outcome in Benton County would set the pattern for the other three counties - that this was the key test.

Kim's mother, Dong, testified the family had exhausted its limited savings just bailing their son out of the Yamhill County Jail, after Newberg police made the initial arrest, and funding his legal defense since.

She told the judge they owed nothing on their Tigard home, purchased 11 years ago for $150,000. But she said that was their only remaining asset.

Dong Kim said she and her husband, Joo, both drove older-model imported cars. She said they had already spent their life savings, including $20,000 for expert witnesses needed for trial.

They came to the United States decades ago, but have extended family in their native Korea.

"Relatives have been willing to help us, that's how we keep going," Dong Kim said. "They've been generous.

"But they have limitations, too. I can't keep asking them."

She said the family could come up with only $30,000 at this point - enough to satisfy a combined bail of $300,000 among the four counties.

When she returned to her seat, her adult daughter wrapped an arm around her shoulders. She adjusted her hair to shield her face as tears welled up in her eyes.

Deputy District Attorney John Haroldson countered by saying that even if Sung Koo Kim had never acted out violently, his fetish for pornography and mutilation was "truly chilling." So the public's interest in protection demands he remain in jail.

And while the court recently banned any reference to the disappearance of coed Brook Wilberger from the vicinity of the Oregon State University campus, the fact that Kim is considered a leading suspect in her presumed abduction, rape and murder still casts a shadow over the case.

"If we found out tomorrow that he had raped, tortured, and mutilated someone, we would not be surprised," he said. He cited "OSU.doc," a file from Kim's personal computer detailing the rape, strangulation murder and mutilation of a female captive, to support his argument.

Haroldson said the court should consider the sheer number of pornographic images found on Kim's computer, as well as their predominant theme of rape, mutilation and murder.

"The quantity indicated a time commitment that is mind-boggling," he said. "More than anything, it allows us to look closer at the subject matter that drives the defendant's obsession."

Kim acted on his fantasies by collecting biographical information and photos of Oregon coeds, then sneaking into their dorms while the students were asleep and stealing their underwear, Haroldson said.

Kim went so far as "videotaping himself in dorm rooms, wearing the fruits of his crimes and masturbating," the prosecutor told the judge. Then he would return home and file his "trophies" with the care of a forensic scientist at work, the prosecutor said.

When his turn came, Connall conceded of his client, "There is evidence that he has an active fantasy life and a major pornography collection." But he said most of the images, while perhaps gruesome, are not illegal.

And Connall, who has always rejected any Wilberger connection out of hand, said, "He has never acted out in a violent fashion. He has always avoided confrontation, never made an overt effort to harm anyone."

He termed Kim as a peaceful, loving person. He said Kim had a fine school record, a degree in biogenetics and a desire to study the effects of aging and cancer.

Connall asked the court to consider bail of $300,000, combined with strict release terms. The court could ask Kim be kept under house arrest and required to wear an electronic monitoring bracelet, he said.

If the Benton County judge agreed to such terms, Connall said, he would schedule bail reduction hearings in the other three counties hoping they would accept that line of reasoning.

After listening to Kim's mother and the opposing attorneys, Holcolm retired to her chambers to deliberate. Members of Kim's family gathered on a row of wooden benches, appearing to date back to the construction of the county's historic courthouse, as they awaited her ruling.

Detective Todd Baltzell joined other law enforcement personnel in huddling up front with Haroldson. A group of television reporters and cameramen formed another group near the back.

About 30 minutes had passed when the judge returned.

She accepted the defense premise that Kim was entitled to reasonable bail. But she accepted the prosecution premise that the volume of nature of the evidence should be factored in.

In the end, she defined bail of $1 million as reasonable and established it there. She said she had taken into account the public's fears, public safety considerations, the threat of future violence and evidence that Kim, who holds a valid passport, had searched the Internet for information countries lacking extradition treaties with the United States.

As family members filed out and headed down the courthouse stairs, Kim's sister said it wasn't fair for the state and media to equate interest in pornography with a penchant for sexual violence. She said many men collected and viewed pornography without raping, mutilating or murdering women.

http://www.newsregister.com/news/story.cfm?story_no=188309
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xx Obsession with porn a danger sign
« Reply #27 on: Dec 21st, 2004, 07:21am »

The sister of Sung Koo Kim, the 30-year-old accused burglar, porn collector and "person of interest" in the Brooke Wilberger abduction case, said something disturbing Friday during a break in her brother's bail hearing. Describing Kim as a gentle, peaceful person, his family asked Judge Janet Holcomb to lower his bail. Instead, the judge raised Kim's bail to $1 million to ensure that he stays locked up.

Although Judge Holcomb did grant a defense motion to strike from the 18 burglary charges and assorted porn charges against Kim all reference to a possible connection to the May 24 abduction of 19-year-old Brooke Wilberger, it is clear that the judge's actions reflect her agreement with investigators and prosecutor, who considers Kim a dangerous man, despite his meek demeanor.

The proximity of the Wilberger abduction to places where Kim is charged with burglary and the theft of panties, drier lint and other personal items; the obsession reflected in Kim's downloading of 40,000 Internet images of rape and extreme violence against women; a Word document he titled "osu" that described the rape, torture and mutilation of a woman; his fascination with members of the Oregon State University swim team (who bear a strong physical resemblance to Wilberger) and his research into countries that do not have extradition agreements with the United States, all are alarming.

This information, while frightening, also is by now familiar. But Kim's sister, Jung Kim, 32, said something that should have sent a chill and a fresh warning to others: During a break in Friday's hearing, she wondered why the public should be so frightened of her brother, when themes of violence against women are so prevalent in best-selling video games and rap music? "I'm really upset because not everybody who does this commits a crime, and some people who don't do this do commit a crime," she said.

Jung Kim is right about violence in video games, music and films. The images in the fifth hit version of the "Grand Theft Auto" series and the new "JFK Reloaded" video game, that lets players take their own shots at JFK, reflects the ready market for such violence, primarily among socially immature young men.

That doesn't mean every person who plays those games is likely to kill, but it does fire the imagination of the death-obsessed. Is it a harmless outlet for daily frustration, or a fertile ground for developing a criminal sexual obsession?

Jung Kim also is right in saying that not everyone who views porn, plays violent video games (or fantasizes about rape, torture and murder, for that matter) is destined to end up a criminal, but she's mistaken in suggesting that people who are convicted of sex crimes may have no interest in porn. An obsession with porn — particularly the hard core stuff — is a well-documented preoccupation common to convicted sex abusers, rapists and murderers.

At some point, the law will determine Sung Koo Kim's activities relative to his interests. In the meantime, if Jung Kim's observations about her brother prompt renewed discussions on where to draw the line between harmless diversion and dangerous obsession where violent imagery and games are concerned, good.
http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/12/21/news/opinion/1ed1221.txt
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xx Abduction creates climate of fear
« Reply #28 on: Dec 31st, 2004, 07:36am »

Corvallis is a small city, under 53,000 people, but it's the sort of place where women think twice before going out jogging alone. They make arrangements to travel in groups, if possible. If they must venture out alone, they arm themselves with a cell phone, pepper spray or a fistful of keys, ready to fight off an attack.

It wasn't always this way. But since the abduction of a young woman in broad daylight May 24, many women have told the Gazette-Times they are taking extra precautions, both at home and when they go out.

When Brooke Wilberger, a 19-year-old Veneta woman, vanished from an apartment complex near Oregon State University, many in the community were shocked. Hundreds of volunteers offered to help look for the woman. Areas near the scene of Wilberger's disappearance were searched thoroughly.

A multi-agency task force, including the Benton County Sheriff's Office, the Corvallis Police Department, the Oregon State Police and the FBI, has continued the search since, following thousands of leads, scouring more than 4,000 acres of property and searching over 6,600 miles of roads. Still, they are waiting for that one tip, the lead that will result in finding Wilberger, police say.

Early on in the search, a horrifying possibility of what might have happened to Wilberger emerged.

Sung Koo Kim, a 30-year-old Tigard man, was named a "person of interest" in the abduction case, and on May 29, his home was searched in the early morning hours. During this and other searches, police reportedly found thousands of undergarments, some of which were labeled with the names of colleges, dorms and women — identifying where the items had been taken. Police say 40,000 images of women being raped, tortured and mutilated were found on Kim's computer hard drives, along with a document titled "osu.doc" that seemed to describe the planned rape and torture of a woman. Records of Internet research on OSU women's swim team members and countries that do not extradite people to the United States for prosecution were also reportedly found.

Though investigators, family and community members still held out hope that Wilberger would be found alive, people were forced to realize that there could be someone out there, Kim or someone else, with terrible intentions toward young women.

Law enforcement and district attorneys in four counties — Benton, Multnomah, Yamhill and Washington — said they had no evidence that directly linked Kim with Wilberger. Still, they asserted that Kim poses a danger to the community and have cited, in court, coincidences between his recent activities and the disappearance of Wilberger. Charged with 18 counts of burglary, theft, possession of child pornography and encouraging child sex abuse, the man is being held on a total of $16 million bail. It is a high amount given the charges, but judges seem convinced that Kim poses a serious threat to his alleged burglary and theft victims and the community at large.

"Evidence has been shown that creates a substantial fear in the victims, much greater than in regular burglary cases," said Benton County Circuit Judge Janet Holcomb at a recent hearing where she raised Kim's Benton County bail amount from $100,000 to $1 million.

This "substantial fear" seems to have spread to the community, making many people, especially women, more careful and suspicious.

Corvallis police say they are getting more reports regarding suspicious people or situations. A citizen who notices a man sitting in a van on the streetcorner for a few hours is more likely to call it in than before. A woman who spots a man following her around at a store is more likely to call police.

"With the Wilberger case being so prevalent to everybody, what would have been blown off before is now being reported," said Lt. Jon Keefer.

At the same time, many people may be more aware of their surroundings and more prepared than before to fight off an attacker or abductor.

When a Corvallis woman was jumped from behind during an early morning walk of the OSU campus in September, she repelled her attacker with pepper spray, which she had at the ready in her hand.

In November, when a woman was punched by a man in a parking lot at Northwest Ninth Street and Grant Avenue, she fought him off as he attempted to push her into her car.

Self-defense classes have been held at OSU, and the Timberhill Athletic Club recently offered a class on using pepper spray for self-defense. As a result, a predator who attacks a woman in Corvallis might get a little more than he bargained for.

Nevertheless, many women still go out jogging or walking alone in Corvallis, day or night, Keefer said. He wonders whether they carry cell phones or pepper spray with them.

Keefer and Lt. Tim Brewer point out that pepper spray is not the "end-all for personal protection." They say education on the topic of personal safety should be a priority in Corvallis.

"I think we as a community can do a better job of telling people how to protect themselves," Brewer said.

In addition to learning self-defense techniques, Brewer listed several common-sense ways people can increase their personal safety. Most important is to always be aware of your surroundings, he said. Take a lighted path at night and try to travel in groups. Carry your keys in your hand when walking — they can be a valuable weapon for personal protection.

A father of teenagers, he added emphatically that people should never, never go near a vehicle when a stranger tries to entice them inside.

"Run away," Brewer said. "Scream for help."

And if you do find yourself in the grip of an assailant, he added, fight for your life.

"Never give up," he said.

"Keep fighting. Keep kicking. Never stop trying to get away."

TOP FIVE

Here are the top five stories in crime of 2004:

• On May 24, Brooke Wilberger disappeared from a Corvallis apartment complex, setting off a massive search that continues today.

• On June 16, 3-year-old Gerardo Lopez was taken from outside his family's apartment, turning up unharmed the next morning. Two members of the boy's extended family were sentenced to 70 months in prison after pleading guilty to second-degree kidnapping.

• On Aug. 10, 18-year-old Robin Jensen was struck by a hit-and-run driver while riding her bike. She died the next morning, and a former Oregon State University student faces a charge of felony hit-and-run.

• On Oct. 19, Mark Miller of Corvallis was fatally beaten downtown. Michael Noel Martin, 20, Cruise Cassidy, 19, and Tyler Boyce, 15, have been charged with murder in the case.

• On Nov. 12, OSU football player Joe Rudulph was arrested for allegedly punching National Guard Sgt. Gabriel Sapp in what police described as a racially charged fight outside the Headline Cafe. A grand jury declined to indict Rudulph for a hate crime, though he's been suspended from the team and faces other charges.
http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2004/12/31/news/top_story/fri01.txt
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xx Re: Brooke Wilberger - May 24, 2004 - OR
« Reply #29 on: Jan 4th, 2005, 05:13am »

Jennifer Longley wears her yellow bracelet in honor of her many relatives who have had cancer, including a grandfather who lost his tongue and voice box and an aunt who died of ovarian cancer.

"I also wear it for me, because I know that this is something that I will continue to deal with in my future," says Longley, 24, who works for the Cornell University Press in Ithaca, N.Y.

Jason "Jazz" Skipworth, a 26-year-old scientist at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, says his bracelet gives him "the extra motivation to work that much harder."

And Eric Nobis, an amateur bike rider in Seattle, is convinced that his bracelet "makes me cycle faster."

Some examples of organizations with fund-raiser bracelets, arranged by color:

RED:


The Diabetes Research Institute is raising funds with its "Insulin Is Not a Cure" bracelets: drinet.org


The non-profit Keep a Child Alive is selling bracelets to raise funds for children with HIV/AIDS: keepachildalive.org

BLUE:


Sydney Davis and Daniel Rosen, friends from North Caldwell who both have juvenile diabetes, are selling bracelets in honor of their 13th birthdays. The bracelets, available at the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center at Columbus-Presbyterian hospital in New York, carry the words "Cure Diabetes Today.":

nbdiabetes.org

PINK:


Target stores and Amazon.com are selling the Target Pink Breast Cancer Awareness Bracelet that says, "Share Beauty Spread Hope." Funds go to breast cancer research.


In Utah, people have been wearing "Find Brooke" bracelets for Brooke Wilberger, a student at Brigham Young University who disappeared in Oregon in May. Proceeds are going to a search-and-rescue fund. findbrooke.com

ORANGE:


The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation has the "MAX-LIFE" fund-raising bracelets, named for Max Rowe, a 9-year-old in St. Louis who has the disease. max-life.org


The L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center and the San Francisco AIDS Foundation are selling bracelets to raise funds and awareness of their annual AIDS bike ride. aidslifecycle.org

GREEN:


7-Eleven stores will soon have bracelets to raise money for the USO, which provides support to members of the military.

ALUMINUM:


HeroBracelets.org is selling bracelets, each with the name of a soldier killed in Iraq. Proceeds go to the Fallen Heroes Fund.

It's just a simple band of yellow rubber, which bears the word "LIVESTRONG" and sells for $1 as a fund-raiser for the Lance Armstrong Foundation, an organization the celebrated cyclist began for fellow cancer survivors. But the yellow bracelet has become a must-have item - and has prompted charitable organizations nationwide to create their own versions, made with various colors, materials and messages.

Some liken the fad to the POW-MIA bracelets people wore for imprisoned and missing soldiers during the Vietnam War, or say the bracelets are the latest twist on the red and pink ribbons that have become synonymous with AIDS and breast cancer, respectively.

Today, red bracelets are being sold to raise money for everything from diabetes research to children with HIV. Vistacare, a health-care company in Scottsdale, Ariz., is giving out burgundy bracelets with the word "Remember" to get people talking about the difficult topic of hospice care. The Ohio Tobacco Use Prevention and Control Foundation is handing out orange bracelets as a conversation starter about the dangers of secondhand smoke.

Genny Neely, a 27-year-old New Yorker, is interested in getting several of the bracelets. She first saw the LIVESTRONG bands while visiting Chicago last summer and said, "I have to have one of those."

Now she plans to get a pink bracelet that several breast-cancer organizations are selling - and a red one from the My Soldier campaign, a program started by an Iraq war veteran that connects U.S. soldiers with civilians who send them letters and care packages. It is a way to show support for a charity, she says.

Sometimes, however, the bracelet wearers are just fashionistas.

Gregory Sutton, a 22-year-old student at Northeastern University in Boston, says he has seen people wearing LIVESTRONG bracelets while standing outside bars and smoking - something he says they wouldn't do if they were truly worried about cancer. "People wear them because they see celebrities wearing them," he says.

Jennifer Gear, a mom in Woburn, Mass., concedes that her 9-year-old begged her for "one of those yellow bracelets that everybody has" without really knowing what they represent.

But, she says, "My feeling is, 'What difference does it make if it's going to a good cause?'Ÿ"

Still others say that, in a small way, the various bracelets help build a sense of community.

"I think we - as humans in a world that is more and more fragmented - look for clues and symbols of inclusion," says Peter Klaus, 28, of Washington, D.C.

Charlie Vogelheim, a 48-year-old in Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif., agrees. He says he often gets silent nods from passers-by who also are wearing LIVESTRONG bracelets. "If there is a conversation, it seems to begin with a connection having already been made," he says.

Michael Mannhard, a 17-year-old in St. Louis, agrees that a bracelet can give "a sense of unity," even among people who might have nothing else in common.

Since LIVESTRONG bracelets are hard to find, he and his brothers, Stephen and Patrick, started making their own bracelets, made of elastic with the words "YOU CAN DO IT!" written on them in marker. So far, they have handed out about 400 of them to friends, family and strangers, all for free.


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