Board Logo
« The Tent Girl (Barbara Hackman) KY »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jan 19th, 2018, 1:43pm



« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1  Notify Send Topic Print
 sticky  Author  Topic: The Tent Girl (Barbara Hackman) KY  (Read 495 times)
FindCarrie
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

For Carrie Always


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 6967
xx The Tent Girl (Barbara Hackman) KY
« Thread started on: Nov 30th, 2004, 07:34am »

This thread is dedicated to the Tent Girl and the man who helped identify her, Todd Matthews. Mr. Matthews has been very kind to me and the Culberson family in our dealings with the DoeNetwork. I shall dedicate this thread to any news on the Tent Girl and Todd.

The Tent Girl: (Excerpt from Website)

On May 17, 1968, Wilbur Riddle discovered the body of a young woman wrapped and tied in a canvas bag thirteen miles north of Georgetown, Kentucky.
First police sketch of "Tent Girl".

That morning Riddle had gone to Eagle Creek, which runs alongside Interstate Highway 75 in Scott County, to look for glass insulators left behind by workmen repairing phone lines in the area; he planned to paint them and sell them as curios. About 11 am, while hunting around near the interchange of I-75 and U.S. 25, he found an odd bag in some bushes just over a fence beside the highway. It was fairly big; a green canvas bag, like a tent would be rolled up in, wrapped all around with a thin cord. Curious, he pulled the bag loose from the underbrush, but it got away from him and rolled the short distance to the edge of the creek. Riddle walked down to the bag and tried to pull it open, when he noticed a horrible odor coming from inside it. He immediately ran to his truck and sped to the nearest pay phone, where he called Bobby Vance, the Scott County sheriff.
Minutes later, Riddle was showing his find to not only Sheriff Vance, but also Deputy Jimmy Williams and Deputy Coroner Kenneth Grant. The bag contained the badly decomposed body of a female, naked but for a towel of some sort that was wrapped around her head; she had obviously been dead for weeks. She was doubled up in the bag, and her right hand was clenched like a fist. A search of the immediate area turned up no other physical evidence.
The body was taken to St. Joseph Hospital in Lexington, where Deputy Coroner Kenneth Grant and his assistants determined the girl had been caucasian, five feet and one inch tall, weighed about 110 to 115 pounds, with an estimated age of between sixteen and nineteen years old, with short reddish-brown hair, and no identifying marks, scars, or piercings. She had not been shot, and she had not been pregnant; she had been dead for about two to three weeks. With dilligence and luck, a single fingerprint was recovered from her badly decomposed hand.

User Image

http://anomalyinfo.com/articles/sa00020.shtml
http://www.angelfire.com/tn3/masterdetective2/

Please visit three other websites headed by Mr. Matthews:
Project Edan
Outpost for Hope
The DoeNetWork

« Last Edit: Nov 30th, 2004, 08:10am by FindCarrie » User IP Logged

Caring About All Missing & Murdered People
Please visit www.FindCarrieCulberson.Com
And www.AngelGardenOfHope.Com
My group inspired to help others because of Carrie.
See also our missing & murdered person blog
http://findcarrie.blogspot.com
FindCarrie
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

For Carrie Always


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 6967
xx Man requests road renamed for Tent Girl
« Reply #1 on: Nov 30th, 2004, 07:35am »

While the story of Tent Girl has drawn worldwide attention, the Tennessee man credited with cracking the case wants the story to receive recognition in Scott County.

Todd Matthews is working to drum up support for a memorial to Tent Girl by having the stretch of road where her body was found, U.S. 25 near Sadieville, renamed in her honor.

"This is something more permanent," Matthews said. "It's not like an article in a paper or a magazine that is going to be thrown away next month."

Tent Girl's body was found wrapped in a tent May 17, 1968, by then-Scott County resident Wilbur Riddle. No positive identification of Tent Girl was made until 1998, when Matthews, Riddle's son-in-law, learned about Hackman from a posting on the Internet. DNA testing later confirmed the woman was Barbara Ann Hackman-Taylor, a 24-year-old woman missing from Lexington since December 1967.


While the story has received attention on national news shows like 48 Hours and Good Morning America and has been in the international spotlight with stories by the London media, Matthews said he doesn't think people in Scott County realize how important the Tent Girl case has been.

"She's become like an icon," he said.

Matthews contends Tent Girl's identification has helped to solve several other missing person cases, as it created missing-persons organizations and placed more attention on the work to unravel the mystery of unidentified bodies.

Though it has been several years since Tent Girl was identified, Matthews said he still receives about 800 e-mails a day about the case.

"Here it is, nearly seven years later, and it hasn't ended yet," he said.

The idea to rename the highway came to him when he was recently in the area with a Court TV camera crew filming a story about Tent Girl, Matthews said. Though he had considered other memorial features, such as an eternal flame or marker to be put in the spot where Tent Girl's body was found, Matthews said he decided the renaming of the highway would be a more fitting tribute.

"I think she is worthy of it," he said.

Unlike a marker, Matthews said renaming the highway would not require any maintenance and would not create a roadway distraction that could cause motorists to have accidents. Having the roadway named in Tent Girl's honor will also hopefully help to raise awareness for other missing-person cases, Matthews said.

Matthews has contacted several Scott County and state officials about his desire to establish the memorial, but so far, his efforts have not sparked any legislation that could prompt the renaming of the highway.

"I've written to everyone that I can get a hold of," Matthews said.

U.S. 25 is a state road, but the decision to change what the road is known as locally would have to be made by county officials, said Ed Whitaker, branch manager of the transportation department in Frankfort.

If the issue were brought before the Scott County Fiscal Court, Judge-Executive George Lusby said changing the name of the road, which is also known as Cincinnati Pike, would be a "major undertaking."

Since everyone who lives on the road would have to change their address, Lusby said changing the road name would be an inconvenience to many people.

Matthews said he will continue "pushing on, one way or another," for the memorial, as he has learned from his work with the case that persistence can pay off.

"I will keep on," he said. "It took me 10 years to identify the Tent Girl, and I will keep on."

http://www.news-graphic.com/articles/2004/11/17/news/news01.txt
« Last Edit: Nov 30th, 2004, 07:36am by FindCarrie » User IP Logged

Caring About All Missing & Murdered People
Please visit www.FindCarrieCulberson.Com
And www.AngelGardenOfHope.Com
My group inspired to help others because of Carrie.
See also our missing & murdered person blog
http://findcarrie.blogspot.com
FindCarrie
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

For Carrie Always


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 6967
xx Request from Todd Matthews
« Reply #2 on: Jan 18th, 2005, 07:23am »

Posting this to help Todd Matthews. Please take a look

I need help. Look on the mainpage of this Ky newspaper.

http://www.news-graphic.com/

On the right you will see a survey and place to post comments. Maybe you guys can help by supporting my bid to name the road in honor of tent girl in the survey.....and write a comment n the comment box??

Below is my own comment that I submitted....and it should help clarify things.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A few of the local TV stations also picked up the story below from the Georgetown Graphic and did help to clarify things a bit.I am not asking for a 911 address revision for this highway dedication. It isn't that complicated of an issue....an honorary type thing. For example:
"Old highway 42" here in my town is called just that....as well as being called the "Rickman Road"....."Old Cookeville Road" and if coming this way....the old "Livingston Road." BUT....a section of it is also call the "Roberts-Matthews memorial highway" in honor of two veterans killed in Vietnam. The official name for the entire road is highway 42. So I see no reason to change anything in the 911 system in bestowing a title of "Barbara -Tent Girl- Hackmann" memorial highway somewhere along the 13 miles stretch between Georgetown and Sadieville. I envision a memorial plaque at both ends of the stretch and the title being a historical type thing. I just want it to be something that the state recognizes as a legitimate memorial.

The Tent Girl case has caused the creation of two entities in Kentucky. When my father in law found the body....the state formed the state medical examiner's office.

http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/3986501.htm

And her identification effected the invent of the state's web-site...

www.UnidentifiedRemains.net

So....I do believe that she deserves the honor of what I have suggested below as part of the state history itself. I am not sure the resident of the county know the impact her story have had on the nation.

The honorary title for the road is not only for her. It will also serve to honor the other missing. Over 100,000 missing persons in North America. And for the unidentified, there are over 5,500 unidentified cases in North America. This isn't even all of them. This huge number is only the numbers submitted to the FBI-NCIC. Not all case are submitted to the NCIC. If that were to change there night be a dramatic effect on the cause as a whole.

This honor is not meant to change the physical address on folks mailboxes or to cause them grief of any kind. It's not just to honor one....but to honor many. And many of the family of the missing look toward this case in Georgetown....so many years ago....for insight into their own loss.

-Todd Matthews

www.TentGirl.com

User IP Logged

Caring About All Missing & Murdered People
Please visit www.FindCarrieCulberson.Com
And www.AngelGardenOfHope.Com
My group inspired to help others because of Carrie.
See also our missing & murdered person blog
http://findcarrie.blogspot.com
FindCarrie
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

For Carrie Always


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 6967
xx Amateur sleuth identifies those dying as 'John Doe
« Reply #3 on: Apr 7th, 2006, 4:36pm »

LIVINGSTON, Tenn. Todd Matthews' work as an amateur sleuth begins with a body, a corpse with no name who has suffered the indignity of dying, often by violence, without a form of identification.

These unidentified John and Jane Does there are currently 43 in Tennessee, according to law- enforcement authorities are often buried in unmarked pauper's graves, easily forgotten because law-enforcement agencies do not have the resources to keep looking for a name to match the body.




But Matthews takes the time.

The 35-year-old man, whose day job is being a quality control inspector at a company that makes parts for auto air conditioners, loves a good mystery, but not the kind that neatly unravels with the reading of a whodunit. Putting a name to unknown faces "they're all someone's mother or daughter, father or son" is a riddle that often takes years, decades, to solve.

"It helps if you're obsessive about this,'' declared Matthews, 35, a mustachioed man with a head of wiry dark hair usually hidden beneath a baseball cap.

It also helps if you have a small army of likeminded individuals to call on for assistance. In this army, Matthews is a ranking officer. In 1998, he helped found The Doe Network, an Internet coalition of people around the world whose mission is to unearth the names of unidentified decedents in their areas. There are now representatives in 22 foreign countries, as well as members in all 50 states.

Their primary tool is the Information Superhighway. The Doe Network stands where Internet technology meets dogged, key-stroking persistence. No trail is too obscure, no clue too tangential, no amount of e-mailing excessive in search of the leanest of facts.

The Doe Network has been credited with discovering the identities of 34 no-name bodies since it organized. That might not sound like many, but considering Doe members operate without pay on their own time, often without the direct help of law enforcement, and that many of the "unknowns" had been dead for years, their success rate is a source of enormous pride for members.

Tom Bodkin, who works at the Hamilton County medical examiner's office in Chattanooga, says Doe members' work is vital.

"The point is that they are checking out possible matches. Everyone we rule out is one less we have to go to later," said Bodkin, a forensic anthropologist who has two Doe case files awaiting the discovery of names. "It's an uphill battle. For these people to be searching through a haystack to find the needle is a great service. They pick up where law enforcement leaves off."

Matthews acknowledges that his work is "akin to grasping at straws.

"You just hope to pull out one piece of information that leads to a more crucial piece,'' he said, sitting at his cluttered computer desk in the living room of his otherwise tidy home that overlooks his hometown of Livingston from a rise known as Short Hill.

Here, late on a night in 1998, he broke his first case, a puzzler that had confounded him for more than a decade. The Jane Doe whose identity he sought had been known simply as Tent Girl. In 1968, her body, wrapped in a canvas tarpaulin, was found near Georgetown, Ky.

The man who discovered the remains was Wilber Riddle, Matthews' father-in-law. Matthews married Lori Riddle in 1988 after both graduated from Livingston Academy.

"It was one of the first things we talked about when I started dating Lori,'' said Matthews, who recalled that his father-in-law was always quick to retrieve a wrinkled magazine article about the Tent Girl from his wallet.

"For some reason, the story of the Tent Girl got inside of me and I couldn't let go. It changed my life. A whole new adventure for me actually began."

For hours on end, Matthews sat at the computer screen, Web-surfing late into the night. "The Tent Girl became an obsession. I was on a self-destructive path with her,'' he said, noting that his marriage suffered.

"There was this other woman in my life. Lori wanted to have faith I could identify the woman, but she felt like it was drawing too much of me away,'' he said.

The night in 1998 when he connected Tent Girl to a Lexington, Ky., woman who had been missing since 1967, Matthews was browsing on a hunch. A message on a genealogical Web site attracted his attention.

"My sister Barbara has been missing from our family since the latter part of 1967. She has brown hair, brown eyes, is around five feet, two inches tall, and was last seen in the Lexington, Ky., area,'' read the posting.

The e-mail was from Rosemary Westbrook from Benton, Ark., who was seeking information about her sister, Barbara Taylor. Matthews shakily typed a reply message: "This girl is my girl."

Westbrook thought so, too. The family persuaded Kentucky authorities to allow an exhumation, and a DNA comparison made it certain: Tent Girl was Barbara Taylor.

"I thought there would be a story in the local newspaper and that would be the end of it. It wasn't,'' Matthews said. What followed was a media storm of attention as national television news shows found their way to Livingston. A book deal with a New York publisher is pending, and a documentary is being filmed now.

His work with The Doe Network led him to create Project EDAN, which stands for "everyone deserves a name." EDAN links artists with police departments that don't have an artist on staff. They provide sketches and, sometimes, sculpted models of what the John or Jane Doe may have looked like.

"Until two weeks ago I had a human head here that we reconstructed," Matthews said. "It's from Campbell County. The detective, quite bluntly, gave me a head in a duffel bag. One of our artists did the reconstruction.''

In his hometown, Matthews went from being "that crazy guy interested in something icky" to "the eccentric, but interesting, guy."

He says he regrets that his search for clues caused him to ignore his wife and two boys at times, but calls the identification of Tent Girl "a life-fulfilling moment."

"I spent 10 years of my life searching for Tent Girl's name. I could have gotten a college degree and an advanced degree in that time, but she taught me a lot more still is."

http://www.dicksonherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060221/NEWS03/602210338
User IP Logged

Caring About All Missing & Murdered People
Please visit www.FindCarrieCulberson.Com
And www.AngelGardenOfHope.Com
My group inspired to help others because of Carrie.
See also our missing & murdered person blog
http://findcarrie.blogspot.com
Evelin
Junior Member
ImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 1
xx Re: The Tent Girl (Barbara Hackman) KY
« Reply #4 on: Nov 8th, 2012, 11:02pm »

Hello, I am new to this site. My heart goes out to her and her family.
User IP Logged

Pages: 1  Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls