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xx Beau Ramsey - AR
« Thread started on: Dec 16th, 2004, 11:12am »

Excerpt from Website Created by Guarding Angels:

CIRCUMSTANCES: Beau was last seen at a job site in the vicinity of the 3600 block of Amber Cir. in Benton, AR. A girl on Reed Street gave Beau gas for his motorcycle at 5:30 p.m. on the day of 8/17/04. His black 2001 Honda motorcycle was later located in a wooded area beside Baxter Trail just East of Highway 35 in Benton, AR. Beau has not been seen since. There has been NO activity on his bank account since he went missing.

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Website for Beau Ramsey:
http://www.angelfire.com/jazz/jazzyrose/Beau.html
« Last Edit: May 24th, 2005, 08:31am by FindCarrie » User IP Logged

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xx Reward for missing man remains in place
« Reply #1 on: Dec 16th, 2004, 11:14am »

Nearly four months have passed since her son went missing and Dee Tucker is surprised she nor officials have had no good leads to the whereabouts of Jeremy Beau Ramsey.

The $5,000 reward Tucker announced in October to anyone with viable information about her son still stands, she said.

Tucker added that she was surprised she received no calls or any response concerning the reward.

"We haven't had good leads in a while ... [Saline County Sheriff Phil Mask] called me [Wednesday] and said his department is still investigating."

"We're still aggressively pursuing any leads that come forward," said Mike Frost, a detective in the sheriff's Criminal Investigation Division.

He said detectives still are receiving second-hand information that does not turn into anything solid.

Because Ramsey's motorcycle was found in the woods near the Saline-Grant county line in late August, Tucker said she urges hunters to be aware of any suspicious things they may come across in the woods.

"I'd ask that they keep their eyes out and that with the least little thing they see to not touch it, but call the sheriff's office."

Frost said that was a good idea and said anything hunters may contact sheriff's office at 303-5642 with anything they discover.

Twenty-four-year-old Ramsey had a bright future ahead, his mother noted. With her voice cracking, anticipating the emotions about to overcome her, she said: "He had a real bright future, now he probably doesn't have a future at all ... I've just got to find him."

Ramsey came back to Saline County after a year at the University of Tennessee. He was a cheerleader, Tucker said, and had always cared about his physical health.

He became involved with methamphetamine when he came back to the county. "Meth is not like any other drug. His counselor always told me: 'One time and you're hooked.' "

"I just want parents in Saline County to know, if it happened to my kid, it can happen to any kid."

Since his motorcycle was found in the woods near the Saline-Grant county line in August, Tucker, husband Jimmy, friends and law enforcement officials from the sheriff's office and surrounding agencies have searched most of the county and into Grant County. No credible evidence has been discovered.

A security videotape from Wal-Mart in Bryant revealed that Ramsey was alone about 1:30 p.m. on Aug. 17 in the discount store.

Two young women reported seeing Ramsey on Conway Street in Benton between 5 and 5:30 p.m. that day, gave him $1 worth of gas and he returned with $5.

Ramsey's bike was found Wednesday, Aug. 18, by a Benton firefighter off Arkansas 35 on Baxter Trail, parked on the kickstand with the keys in the ignition.

He had begun a new job with Ernie Bailey, framing houses, Monday, Aug. 16.

About 10 a.m. the next day, Ramsey was following fellow workers to a job site on his bike. Ramsey reportedly dropped farther back in traffic from the workers' vantage point. They said they eventually couldn't see Ramsey in the rear-view mirror.

John Thibault, Ramsey's friend since they were 11 or 12, told Tucker he heard from Ramsey during the lunch hour that day and that they made plans to meet later in the afternoon. Tucker said Thibault said he has been calling old friends but that no one has heard from Ramsey.
http://www.bentoncourier.com/articles/2004/12/03/news/24rnews.txt
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xx Facing holidays without someone for first time
« Reply #2 on: Dec 24th, 2004, 11:26pm »

It happens to everyone at some time or another: A loved one is missing for the first time at Christmas or another holiday.

Natural deaths are hard enough, but different circumstances may add to the grief period.

Sometimes, the loved one hasn't passed away, but hasn't been heard from or is missing.

That affects people in our area this year. As noted in this space before, my first cousin, Dee Tucker, has been searching for her son, Beau Ramsey, since Aug. 17.

A friend who has a son serving in Iraq, stationed at Mosul, received word from his sergeant Tuesday. that he was 90 percent sure her son had been out on a convoy that is missing. As of Wednesday afternoon, she and her husband had still not received word on his status.

Any "first Christmas without" someone is difficult, especially if that person happened to enjoy the holiday.

Each special occasion or holiday that passes may be special for certain people. But Christmas is a big one for a lot of people and a time when families often gather.

That tends to bring up recollections of loved ones who have died in the previous year and the sadness that may accompany such memories.

In some ways it has been a Christmas season like that for me. I have not been in my usual high holiday spirit, rushing to play Christmas music before anyone else.

I just haven't been in the mood. When I asked my pastor, Paul, how to fight such feelings, he suggested that I go into each day looking for an opportunity to help each person I encountered.

It was a different way to approach the day, as ashamed as I am to admit that. I usually wake up considering the next few hours facing me and my loved ones. But I must also acknowledge that the shift in perspective did wonders for my attitude. (Don't tell him I said so, but my pastor knows his stuff.)

The difference in the way I faced each day, in fact, probably saved Christmas for me this year. And the beauty of it is, of course, that entering the day looking for ways to interact with someone and to help a fellow human being brings me much closer to what the real reason for Christmas is supposed to be.

Regardless of your religious affiliation or your lack of one, celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ is a global phenomenon, with spiritual, commercial and cultural overtones.

Many historians - agnostics included - have acknowledged that Jesus was the one individual in world history whose life had the most influence.

That influence exists today. As has been explored in newsmagazines in recent reports, churches in general may be experiencing trouble growing, but spirituality and general interest in following the teachings of a deity seems to be exploding.

People still seek inner growth, regardless of what they call it. And it's that same "hole in the heart" that seems to need filling when a loved one's presence is missed at the holiday or any other time.

It's the same emptiness that we feel when we have material things in our possession, but still don't feel like our life is full. We seek strength and support from a higher power during times of need because we are human and that thirst for such help is a part of us.

The question for those nonbelievers becomes: Who put that thirst there? If not who, then how did it get there and how do we fill it without God or some other deity?

Great philosophical discussions go with that question, of course, and I am unqualified to take part in them. But I do know that when I am hurting, lonely, scared, perplexed, lost, anxious or joyous beyond belief, I find myself going to Jesus in prayer of some sort.

It was that way before I turned a corner in my spiritual journey recently and it certainly is that way now.

Christmas, at least the commercial, gift-receiving part, is for children, they say. But I can personally testify that adults can get something special from it if we approach it in the spirit of the man on whose birth it is based.

And sometimes, using that approach is the only way to get through a tough time. Concentrate on helping others who are less fortunate ... consider the fact that the person we miss this holiday a gift from God and celebrate knowing them by helping someone else.

Mike Dougherty is the news editor of the Benton Courier. His column runs Sundays and Thursdays. His e-mail address is doughertywriter@yahoo.com.

http://www.bentoncourier.com/articles/2004/12/23/opinions/68yoped.txt
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xx Woman continues search for missing son
« Reply #3 on: Jan 1st, 2005, 04:25am »

A Saline County woman will continue searching today for her son who was last seen Aug. 17 in Benton.

The Saline County Search and Rescue Team searched again on Saturday the wooded area near the Saline-Grant county line for Beau Jeremy Ramsey, 24, who has been missing since Aug. 17.

He reportedly was last seen between 5 and 5:30 p.m. that day by a young woman who gave him less than $1 worth of gas, Ramsey's mother, Dee Tucker, said. The Saturday Benton Courier article on this continuing search incorrectly reported that Ramsey had asked the woman for gas money. Tucker said Saturday that her son rode up in the woman's driveway, asked for gas and gave her $5 for it.

Tucker said about 30 to 40 people assisted in Saturday's search.

Ramsey's motorcycle was first discovered Wednesday, Aug. 18, by a Benton firefighter off Arkansas 35 on Baxter Trail parked on the kickstand with the keys in the ignition.

Detectives of the Saline County Sheriff's Department know that Ramsey was in Wal-Mart about 1:30 p.m. Aug. 17, because they have viewed the discount store's security videotapes and a receipt from the store was found Sunday in Ramsey's basement apartment he lives in at the home of his father (Tucker's ex-husband), Jerry Ramsey, on Amber Circle.

Along with the receipt, Ramsey's wallet, money, checkbook, bank debit card and backpack were found. In addition, a bag of clean unused syringes were discovered.

Beau Ramsey had begun a new job Monday, Aug. 16 with Ernie Bailey, framing houses.

About 10 a.m. the next day, Ramsey was following fellow workers to a job site on his bike. Ramsey reportedly dropped farther back in traffic along from the workers' vantage point. They eventually couldn't see Ramsey in the rear-view mirror of the pickup in which they were riding.

John Thibault, Ramsey's friend since they were 11 or 12, has told Tucker he heard from Ramsey during the lunch hour that day and that they made plans to meet later in the afternoon. Tucker said Thibault told her that he has been calling old friends but that no one has heard from Ramsey.

http://www.bentoncourier.com/articles/2004/12/31/news/37fnews.txt
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xx Despite rumors, Benton man still not found
« Reply #4 on: Jan 1st, 2005, 04:26am »

Nearly a month after he went missing, Beau Jeremy Ramsey of Benton still has not been found, but that has not stopped his family or county officials from continuing their search.

Ramsey was last seen Aug. 17, and his motorcycle was found a day later off of Baxter Trail near the Saline-Grant county line by a Benton firefighter. Since then, members of both county sheriff's departments have conducted searches throughout the area.

Dee Tucker, Ramsey's mother, has been searching every day. She, along with her husband and sister, have not been back to work since Ramsey's disappearance.

"We just wake up every morning and try somewhere that we haven't before," Ramsey said. "We have been in different parts of the woods, we have been on down into Grant County, and we have checked all of the rivers."

The Saline County Sheriff's Department also is conducting its investigation into the disappearance, but Capt. Jim Andrews said rumors and false leads have slowed the department down.

"We get as many as two to four leads per day, and we have to follow up on every one," Andrews said. "What that does is lead to a couple of wild goose chases, and that can mess us up. We have to take each call seriously, but sometimes it is just people stirring things up. We don't need that, and the family definitely does not need that."

Several rumors have been circulating throughout the county in the past few weeks about the whereabouts of Ramsey, but so far, none have had any merit. That has not stopped the department from checking each one.

"You have to [check each lead] because it's that one that is right that can help us find Beau," Andrews said.

Ramsey was last seen on Conway Street in Benton by two women between 5-5:30 p.m. Aug. 17. Receipts and videotape indicate he was at Wal-Mart in Bryant earlier in the day. About 10 a.m. that morning, Ramsey was following fellow workers to a job site on his bike. Ramsey reportedly dropped farther back in traffic from the workers' vantage point. They eventually couldn't see Ramsey in the rear-view mirror.

His motorcycle was found the following day with the keys still in the ignition.

Two days later, a full-scale search was conducted by Grant and Saline County sheriff's departments with more than 40 people involved. Subsequent searches have included fewer people, but Tucker and her family have looked every day since.

Tucker remains hopeful that she will find her son, but she is tired of the rumors, and she said she wishes for real help from someone.

"We just wish somebody would come forward with some real information," Tucker said. "Someone has to know something, and we need help right now."

http://www.bentoncourier.com/articles/2004/12/31/news/34wnews.txt
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xx Time to help, look outside box in Ramsey search
« Reply #5 on: Jan 23rd, 2005, 11:03am »

My pastor Paul mentioned in a sermon recently that we need to remember that the gangs of Central Arkansas are actually made up of our children and our neighbors' children.

The same applies with the drug problems that are mentioned in connection with Saline County, if you think about it.

My cousin Dee Tucker, in her quest to find out what happened to her son, Beau Jeremy Ramsey, has experienced a lot of frustration.

Dee has not slept a lot since she found out Aug. 22 that her son was missing, reportedly last seen Aug. 17.

She has not quit looking for Beau - she organizes searches, talks to public officials and calls law enforcement officers, urging them to stay the course. She and her husband, Jimmy Tucker, have offered a $5,000 reward, with virtually no takers.

She lobbies for tougher laws governing the dispensing of cold medicine that contains some of the ingredients for methamphetamine.

The problem is that Saline County sheriff's deputies have found nothing substantial to use in tracking Beau's whereabouts. They say they check out leads when they trickle in, but nothing has broken.

Detectives - and Dee - need a break in the case. They need someone to come forward with solid information that will send them in the right direction on where to find Beau or his body.

Dee said she knows that it's likely that her son is not alive. If he were, she said, he would have called her by now.

But she said she needs to find Beau or find out what happened to him.

She said she realizes many people believe her son's disappearance is related to his involvement with methamphetamine a couple of years ago. And, she said she believes it's the reason some people are reluctant to expend much energy searching for him or investigating the case, even though his motorcycle was left with keys in the ignition on Baxter Trail just east of Arkansas 35 near the Grant County line. And she understands that, with this county's history of drug violence, it could be the reason people who might know something about Beau are not coming forward.

This is a mother who loves her son dearly.

Her own mother, Anna Jean Dougherty Holland (my aunt), died of cancer weeks after Dee graduated from McClellan High School in 1975 and five years after she was first told she had months to live.

Dee has battled cancer herself. Now Beau is missing and she is not giving up. That's why she has stayed on the detectives' "case" and that's why she has talked with parents of missing children across the country, trying to gain any advantage that might give her a chance to find her 24-year-old son.

She moved to Saline County to get away from an area in southwest Little Rock that had become rough and overrun with drugs and gangs.

But Beau eventually began using meth. The Tuckers sent him to a rehabilitation center. He gradually began winning the battle, Dee said, and began holding down a job again and had just started a new one framing houses when he disappeared.

Because the leads seemingly have dried up, Dee consulted a psychic who has encountered some success in helping police find missing people. Detectives are skeptical about using psychics, citing the fact that such techniques go against everything they have been taught and trained to do.

Still, with nothing breaking in the case, one would like to think that trying something "out of the box" is better than doing nothing. She is asking detectives to consider an offer by the Little Rock psychic who has told them she believes she can help find Beau's body.

"I know it's a desperate act," Dee said, "but I'm a desperate mom."

We should understand such desperation. We are fathers and we are mothers.

Whether we want to acknowledge it or not, it could just as easily be our son who has not come home. It could just as easily be our daughter who became involved with the wrong friends and began using drugs.

It could be us asking sheriff''s detectives to seek help from a psychic. It could be us begging someone ... anyone ... to come forward.

http://www.bentoncourier.com/articles/2005/01/23/opinions/67zoped.txt
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xx Reader believes missing man is child of Saline Cou
« Reply #6 on: Jan 31st, 2005, 07:03am »

No child left behind, no man left behind Š It has become a serious quote to indicate the importance of the individual and the responsibility of either a squadron of soldiers or a group of educators not to allow one soul to be lost on the battlefield or in the classroom.

Who among us would not consider the war on drugs to be a war here in Saline County? Every battle that is waged is waged at the expense of the taxpayers and at great danger for the law enforcement officer. The cost is high, but we can not afford to lose this battle, much less the war ... or the cost is even higher to the county, the state and the nation.

In addition to law enforcement officials, there are other people involved as well. Family and friends of the person who has bungled his or her way into the life of drugs and has been incapable of prying themselves loose from this terrible addiction are also victims in this war. The innocent people in the addict's life are just as much victims as the people who are in the way of the addict when he or she has a need for another fix. Their children or friends are valuable to them and if at all possible, even though addicts, they should not "be left behind," either.

So, in the war on drugs, we all need to remember that a missing drug user is still a member of a family and that the family and the individual are just more on a long list of casualties of a great evil that seems to be inflicting this county. For those reasons, even a current or former drug user who is missing is still a human being with people who are deeply concerned and love him. That missing person should be important to find for the family's sake and for his friends.

We should all be aiding Dee Tucker in her search for her son, Beau Ramsey - both county officials and local citizens. Whatever it takes, whatever may help, this is a child of Saline County and, as such, should not be left behind.
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xx There is waiting ... and then there's agony
« Reply #7 on: Mar 26th, 2005, 11:18pm »



Waiting is something that we are taught we must do from time to time. But even though we have done it all of our lives, some of us don't do it that well.

I am among that group. I don't wait well, but I'm better at it than I used to be.

On Monday I spent time in the waiting room at my doctor's office. (I was there for a long-postponed physical.) I waited after I was taken inside by the nurse. My doctor apologized, acknowledging that it was "a bad Monday."

After picking up a friend who worked in my doctor's building, we went to a pizza joint, where we waited some more. We waited on a waitress, and we waited on our order.

Restaurants are another place we've become accustomed to waiting. Where we eat seems to determine how long we are willing to wait for our food. If we go to a fast-food restaurant, we expect our food NOW. If we go to a "good" restaurant, we seem willing to give the cook or chef time to perfect his creation. But the question is, in that case, what happens when the chef doesn't achieve perfection? Do we get part of our money back? Do we get part of our time back?

The next day I took my friend to her doctor for a medical procedure. We spent time in his waiting room. She was called in, then I waited some more. I started counting how much time I had spent waiting on people who were actually being paid for their services. This column was born during that time, but other than that, I didn't come out ahead Š

I remember hearing a man on a KMOX (St. Louis) radio talk show a few years ago advocate that we charge a doctor for all the time we spend waiting in his waiting room past the time for our appointment. He maintained that it was time that we taught doctors that our time was just as valuable as their time.

He said he started billing doctors for all the time he spent in their waiting room beyond his appointment time. If he had an appointment at 2:30, and he was called in at 3, he sent the doctor a bill for a half-hour at the going rate for his profession - I don't remember what he did for a living, but he likely was an efficiency consultant of some kind. What do they charge now? $100 per hour? Maybe it grabbed someone's attention.

I love the line the Toby Ziegler character, played brilliantly by Richard Schiff, uses on "The West Wing" when he listens to what he considers a ridiculous conversation: "There's 20 minutes of my life I'll never get back."

While it seems like a flip remark, there's a lot of truth to it. We only have so much time on this earth, and we do seem to waste a lot of it.

Many of us claim that we just "can't find the time" when someone asks why we don't do something we say we love. But if we were to let someone else analyze the way we spend our waking hours, we might be amazed.

I'm not talking about coming up with a schedule in which we have no "down time." I think we need some. If you want to spend yours watching reality shows and I want to use mine playing a video baseball game online with my son in Boston, that's our choice.

But if I don't have enough time to write or you don't have enough time to get the project in the back yard done, we have to look at where that time is going.

Time may be relative, but it is also finite. We have a certain number of hours and we should spend them wisely ... waiting or not.

Certainly, one example of not knowing how much time we have to spend with our loved ones is my first cousin, Dee Tucker. Her only child, 24-year-old Beau Ramsey, has been missing since Aug. 17.

Each holiday brings another set of memories to savor and a different set of feelings to ponder for her.

Easter is no different:

"I used to hide eggs for him," Dee said. "When he got tired of hunting them, he would hide them for me ... up till he got too old.

"Then I did him like Grandma used to do us and I'd stick money inside the plastic eggs so that, even though we were teenagers, we would still hunt at least one more time.

"Once he got past that, he used to love hiding them for all of his little cousins."

We may get tired of waiting in a doctor's office, and Dee is likely tired of waiting for news that's probably not good. But she still needs to find out what happened. For us, it can be placed at the back of our brains as another news story. For her, waiting is the ultimate reality every day.

Mike Dougherty is news editor of the Benton Courier. His column appears Sundays and Thursdays. His e-mail address is doughertywriter@yahoo.com.
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xx News Story Part 1
« Reply #8 on: May 2nd, 2005, 12:10pm »

A VANISHING IN SALINE COUNTY

Where is Beau Jeremy Ramsey?

It was around four, maybe five, in the afternoon, Aug. 17, 2004, when Candice West stopped at the Benton home of her grandparents, Van and Jewel Chism; they live across Arkansas 35 from her. A young man was walking a motorcycle through the Chism’s semicircular driveway, which curls to an exit onto Reed Street. Seated beside Candice, her 12-year-old niece Katie Watson giggled and said, “He’s cute.” Candice says they both noticed his “wife-beater tank top, a white one, like you see your grandpa wearing.”

As she got out of her truck, the man turned, his face stiff and blank. “Do you have a gas can?” he asked. Crossing the highway, she grabbed a can from her front porch and brought it to him. He topped the bike’s fuel tank, which, oddly, was nearly full. Anyway, if he needed gas, thought Candice, why didn’t he get it at the Super Stop he’d just driven past.

“He looked terrified,” she recalls. “His face was white and his eyes were big, and he never would really look me in the eye.” Instead, he kept peering over his shoulder, scanning the highway like a man being chased.

Candice was already back in her truck when she noticed he was having trouble starting the cycle. She got out and was about to offer help when he got the bike going. Taking out his wallet, he silently handed her a five-dollar bill. Then, pulling onto the highway, he sped off, heading south.

More than a week later, the “Benton Courier” ran a story about a missing man. Recognizing his picture, Candice couldn’t help wondering, “What would have happened if I hadn’t had gas? Would he have asked me to take him somewhere?” Wanting to help, she called the Saline County Sheriff’s Department and recounted the incident at her grandparents’ house. Later, she learned that she was the last person known to have seen Beau Jeremy Ramsey before he vanished that Tuesday afternoon, eight days before his 24th birthday.

Five days passed before Beau’s parents knew their only child was missing. Divorced since 1982, Dee Tucker and Jerry Ramsey are both remarried and living in Benton. Beau was staying at Jerry’s home, in an apartment on the lower level, but he and his mother were close. He called her most days, and they saw each other weekends. The previous Saturday, however, he had gone to his great-grandmother’s funeral in Mountain View.

Sunday night, Aug. 15, Beau called to tell Dee he was starting a new job the next day, framing houses. When she hadn’t heard back from him by Thursday, she called Jerry. Beau hadn’t been home since Monday evening, he said, but he was probably just out sewing wild oats. Unconvinced, Dee called Beau’s friends, but no one remembered seeing him since Monday night.

Friday night Dee drove her pickup along Hwy 35, peering into ditches, afraid Beau had wrecked the motorcycle he had bought just two weeks before. She knew he wasn’t wearing a helmet; she’d planned to get him one for his birthday. She had no way of knowing that she was passing right by the spot where several people had seen her son’s abandoned bike that week. By Saturday, she says, “I was getting a real sick feeling in my stomach.”

Jerry was starting to worry too. A pharmacist at St. Vincent Doctor’s Hospital in Little Rock, he also works part-time for a homecare pharmacy, so his and Beau’s work schedules didn’t always mesh. In fact, he admits, “I rarely saw him.” Besides, he says, “This wasn’t the first time Beau had not come home on a nightly basis, so I didn’t think anything unusual about that.” But the next day, Sunday, Aug. 22, he found a message on his answering machine. It was from the Saline County Sheriff’s Department: Beau’s bike had been found. “That’s when I knew something was wrong,” he says.

Beau’s 2001 Honda black 250 was parked off Baxter Trail, a logging road that edges through dense pine woods just east of Arkansas 35 near the Saline-Grant County line. The bike was propped on its kickstand, key in the ignition, as if its owner had just stepped through the underbrush to answer a call of nature, expecting to return momentarily.

The land is leased to a deer club, and hunters were in and out all week, preparing for the upcoming season. Tracy Manning spotted the cycle when he came out to work on the gate to the property, which is owned by International Paper and used for clear-cutting.

Ed Dodson and Bob Clay, president of the deer club, also saw the bike. “We called the sheriff’s department and talked to a dispatcher,” he says. “They said someone would be right out. We waited around for two or three hours, but nobody showed up, so we left.”

Cpl Mike Frost, with the sheriff’s Criminal Investigation Division (CID), says, “There is no record that we ever received a call about that bike being out there.” Dee, however, says a dispatcher told her about taking Clay’s call.

Benton firefighter Russell Evans saw the bike on Saturday, Aug. 21, when he went out to set up digital game cameras. The next day, when he returned to find the bike still there, he called his brother-in-law, Ryan Jacks, an Arkansas State Trooper. Jacks ran the license plate, then called a wrecker to tow the bike.

It’s rare for Jacks to personally contact the owner of an impounded vehicle, but this case struck him as suspicious, so he went to the address listed on the motorcycle’s registration. He was baffled by Jerry’s dispassionate reaction to the news—unaware of the earlier call from the sheriff’s office.

“That call sticks in my craw,” Jerry says, his voice flat, barely audible. “If we had known about the bike earlier, we could have turned in a missing person report earlier and the trail obviously wouldn’t have been as cold.” Then he adds, irritation pinching his words, “And instead of me just being able to go down the road three or four miles, I had to pay $135 to pick up the bike.”

When Jerry called Dee to tell her he had Beau’s motorcycle, she says, “I felt like somebody had just ripped my heart out. I had a feeling I was never going to see him again.” Saying this, she starts to cry, but quickly regains her composure.

Dee is a warrior, not given to weeping. Short on tact, she is long on mulish determination—and she has made no secret of her displeasure with the investigation into her son’s disappearance. She and her husband Jimmy immediately went to the sheriff’s office to file a missing person report. “They couldn’t even find a form,” she says, indignation raising her voice. “We had to write the information down on notebook paper.”

This was not the first time Dee had feared for Beau’s life, though nothing in his early years prepared her for the coming trouble. Always a charmer—good-looking and full of personality—he was elected “Biggest Flirt” by his classmates. He was smart and performed well in school, but shrugged off a chance to join the Gifted and Talented program, saying it was strictly for nerds.

Beau also excelled as an athlete, even attracting the notice of baseball scouts. His cheerleading skills led to a small scholarship at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

In spite of a rigorous training regimen, Beau ended his first semester with a 3.25 GPS. His cheerleading coach was so impressed with his drive and ability that when he had to go home to recuperate from pneumonia, she arranged for makeup tests. But Dee was barely home from driving him back to school in Dec. 1999, when he called, crying, and begged her to come get him. He was homesick and wanted to quit college. Against her better judgment, Dee returned to Knoxville and brought him home.

Over the next three years, it became clear that Beau’s problems went far beyond immaturity. In 2001, he got a DUI, and he was arrested for assault when he and his girlfriend—both intoxicated, according to Dee—got into an argument that ended with Beau throwing a rock at her car. In both cases, he was given probation. Eventually, Dee had to face facts: her son’s life had become about getting and using methamphetamine.

Methamphetamine, or meth, is a highly addictive central nervous system stimulant that can be injected, snorted, smoked or taken orally. Initially, users feel a short but intense "rush," and stay awake for days at a time, eating little. Prolonged use ravages the mind and body, causing a range of effects from facial sores, loss of teeth and severe anorexia to depression, paranoia and stroke.

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xx Part Two of Beau Ramsey Article
« Reply #9 on: May 2nd, 2005, 12:11pm »

Robert Herzfeld, prosecuting attorney for Arkansas’ 22d Judicial District, has declared war on methamphetamine in Saline County. “It is the number one hard-core drug in our county,” he says. Rural settings, where cooking odors are less detectable, are ideal for clandestine labs. To a base of ephedrine or pseudoephedrine (found in cold and asthma medicines) meth cooks add other products, including red phosphorous, battery acid, lye, lantern fuel and antifreeze. Herzfeld says Arkansas is among the top five states in terms of meth lab arrests, and Saline is the worst county in the state.

Marty Caldwell, who “bonded” with Beau when they traveled with a group called Cheer Central, noticed changes after he came home from college. “He was irritable, and he wasn’t as big,” she says. Beau had been known for his strength, literally supporting female cheerleaders in the palms of his hands. Marty told him, “This isn’t you,” and he admitted, “I need help.”

Another friend, who asked to remain anonymous, saw Beau the summer of 2003. “I could tell he was on something,” she says. Her boyfriend, who was with her, asked who Beau was. “I told him it was a friend from high school that never grew out of the partying stage.”

Over the next three years, Beau’s behavior became increasingly bizarre. One night, when he was living with Dee and Jimmy, she found him staring blankly at a fuzzy television screen. Another time, he told her, “You need to let me shoot you up or somebody else is going to do it, and it’s not going to be so nice.” He warned her that certain people had it in for her because she wanted Beau to stop using meth, saying, “They don’t want me to quit, Mom. They won’t let me go.” Was this meth-induced paranoia, or was Beau caught up in the county’s drug underworld?

Finally, in November 2003, Beau agreed to enter a drug rehabilitation facility in Oklahoma called Narconon. The treatment, developed by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, includes a detoxification protocol that allegedly eliminates drug cravings.

Narconon eschews traditional 12-step programs, and Beau was not part of a recovery support group once he left the treatment center in January 2004. Even so, Dee believes he never returned to methamphetamine use. She remains convinced in spite of what she found at his apartment after she learned about his disappearance.

The door to the apartment was unlocked, lights ablaze. Neatly laid out on top of Beau’s TV set were his watch, wallet and checkbook, a bank debit card and some cash. Dee found a Wal-Mart receipt in the backpack he left behind on the bed. At 1:30 on the afternoon he disappeared, he had bought a ten-pack of syringes. Later, detectives would view Beau’s videotaped image as he purchased them. The packet lay unopened on the bathroom counter.

Some might see the syringes as evidence that Beau was again mainlining methamphetamine—but not Dee. She believes he was injecting steroids to bulk up his 5’6” frame. Some of Beau’s friends tell a different story, though the truth is not easily discernible in statements that are often self-serving.

Here’s what is known: At about 10 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 17, Beau turned off on Arkansas 35 instead of following co-workers to a new job site. Three-and-a-half hours later he was standing in the checkout line at Wal-Mart in Bryant. Around four or five that afternoon, he was back on Arkansas 35 getting gas from Candice West. Where was he, what was he doing during those missing hours? Of course, the most compelling question of all is this: Where is Beau Jeremy Ramsey now?

As the Saline County Sheriff’s Department continues its investigation into Beau Ramsey’s disappearance, Dee Tucker finds fault, and one of Beau’s oldest friends becomes a “person of interest.”

If you know something about Beau Ramsey's whereabouts, contact the Saline County Sheriff’s Department at (501) 303-5609.



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xx Beau Has been Found
« Reply #10 on: May 15th, 2005, 10:17pm »

With great sadness I post this message today. We were just informed by Beau Ramsey's mother that Beau's remains were found. We will have more details later.
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xx Remains Of Missing Benton Man Are Found In Grant C
« Reply #11 on: May 15th, 2005, 11:27pm »

What appears to be the remains of a Benton man missing since August is found in Grant County.

It is a sad ending to a long search and officials now believe the remains discovered by a family friend Sunday afternoon are those of Beau Ramsey.

Beau Ramsey was last seen riding his motorcycle August 17, 2004.

His bike was found on Highway 35 the following week he went missing, but Ramsey's whereabouts remained a mystery until now.

Dee Tucker, mother of Ramsey, says she knew her son was somewhere in the woods near their home.

(Tucker) "Just had a real strong feeling."

After authorities stopped searching for her son, Tucker and a close friend began searching the area, which covers Grant and Saline Counties.

Sunday, her friend decided to search alone on an isolated dirt road and found a clothed skeleton and a set of keys. This was the evidence, which was the first step in identifying the remains.

(Sheriff Sammy Pruitt) "We believe this is Beau Ramsey. There were some keys found that did unlock his residence where he was living."

Ramsey's mom says she's relieved that her son may have been found, but she and the authorities still have a long road ahead.

(Pruitt) "The investigation is just beginning. We'll follow every lead and do everything we can to solve this."

(Tucker) "I think somebody's done something to him. I don't do know why and I don't know what, but the first part of my wish was to find my son and the second was to get justice for him so I'm going to be as tenacious about getting justice for him as I was about finding him."

The remains are being sent to the state crime lab for further examination.

The case is being treated as a homicide. The investigation will be a joint effort among the Grant and Saline County Sheriff's Departments, as well as Arkansas State Police.
http://www.katv.com/news/stories/0505/228547.html
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xx Good visit, good story, good attitude, Beau's Web
« Reply #12 on: May 24th, 2005, 08:32am »

Good visit, good story, good attitude, Beau's Web site


My daughters, who live in Texas, came to see me last week. Molly, 20, just finished her sophomore year at Austin College in Sherman. Megan, 17, is a week away from being a senior at Mansfield High School in Mansfield, where she lives with her mother.

Megan had to go back for school Sunday, but Molly stayed until Thursday afternoon.

They both got their hair cut and "highlighted" and went shopping with Nancy on Saturday afternoon. They took in a Travelers game at Ray Winder Field on Saturday night. On Sunday, we went to church, and then grilled out when my folks came over Sunday afternoon. Molly also went with us to a game Tuesday night.

Otherwise, she stayed up late watching Season 1 DVDs of "The O.C.," a Fox primetime soap opera, and slept late in the morning. My mom retrieved her and took her to lunch one day and she came over to the newspaper office and let me take her to lunch two other days. On nights we didn't spend at Ray Winder, we took her to eat Mexican and seafood.

In between all that, she talked via cell phone with a guy from her old hometown of Wichita Falls who now attends Texas A&M and two "just friends" who like baseball and attend Austin College with her. (She tells me good stuff - like baseball - about them first. I'll hear about their pet snakes and Harley-Davidson tattoos on the next visit, I'm sure.)

It was just a normal first week off from school for Molly. That's what I've tried to tell them since their mom and I split up four years ago: "I just want to see you occasionally. You don't have to 'do stuff' with me. You can talk on the phone with friends (even boys) and go out on dates if you want. Just come see me."

For the first time, this week felt like it should have. I felt like they were here just to see me. They even asked if they could have Texas guys come visit them when they come back this summer. I said yes, but surely I can find Arkansas guys who fit the job description between now and then. That way, when the girls go home, the guys don't go with them.

I enjoyed Ricky Duke's story Thursday about David Reed being the first black male to graduate from Bauxite High School. It was interesting and well done.

I have no idea if Bauxite ever had racial problems in the past.

But what I thought was great is that, because there have been none since he started to school there, this is the first we've heard about Reed.

He and his parents chose the Bauxite School District because it had what they believed he needed at the time. When he enrolled, school officials made nothing of it and his parents sought no publicity.

They wanted a good education for their son, so he transferred to Bauxite. Period. End of story. A nice end of story.

Some people deal with adversity well. Others don't.

I like the way Herb Flores is handling the unfortunate occurrence of salmonella at his Cafe Santa Fe restaurant last month.

He has done everything in his power to fix the problem. Now he is working to comply with Arkansas Department of Health requirements for clearing his employees to work again and for reopening the restaurant.

Flores seems to be doing things the right way for the right reasons. He hasn't blamed anyone; he's simply gone about getting things done properly.

We wish him and the restaurant well.

Dee Tucker, my first cousin who lost her son, Beau Ramsey, last week, asked me to publish the URL address of the Web site devoted to Beau because a number of people had expressed an interest in seeing pictures of him. Thanks to all who have written or called, expressing their sympathy and good wishes.

http://Beau.4ourangel.com

Mike Dougherty is the city editor of the Benton Courier. His column runs Sunday and Thursday.

http://www.bentoncourier.com/articles/2005/05/23/opinions/64ioped.txt
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xx Remains belong to Ramsey
« Reply #13 on: May 26th, 2005, 10:11am »

By Jillian McGehee
Courier Staff


The state Crime Laboratory has determined that the human remains found last week in northern Grant County are those of Beau Ramsey of Benton.

Crime Lab officials said Tuesday that they made a positive identification though Ramsey's dental records.

Ramsey's remains were located 200 yards north of Baxter Trail near Benning Road in northern Grant County on Sunday, May 15.

Donna Gentry, friend of Ramsey's mother, Dee Tucker, found a pair of blue jeans that day that matched the description of what Ramsey was wearing when the 23-year-old went missing on Aug. 17, 2004.

The densely wooded area near the Saline County line is 3.1 miles from where Ramsey's motorcycle was found along Baxter Trail near Arkansas 35 on Aug. 18 of last year.

"I'm happy we found him," Tucker said. "The thing that was ripping my heart out is knowing that he was out there in the woods by himself."

Tucker said her "mission now is to find out who murdered my son because I don't want one parent to suffer through the things that I have suffered through."

Ramsey's remains were scattered over an extended area, law enforcement officials said. They searched an area on May 15 that was at least 50 by 50 yards.

Tucker, Gentry, and Saline and Grant County law officers had searched the area before. The thick undergrowth may have contributed to their inability to see anything last August and fall, they acknowledged.

Grant County Sheriff Sam Pruitt said officials are treating the case as a homicide "until proven differently. We're going to attempt to get to the bottom of what happened."

Grant County Detective Nathan Cook said "we are investigating tips that were given and reinterviewing everyone that Saline County (detectives) talked to."

Although the Crime Lab identified Ramsey's remains, Cook said "we're still waiting to hear what else the crime lab determines."

"We're starting fresh," he said. "Saline County had it as a missing person case. He was found in Grant County, so we'll go from here."

Arkansas State Police investigators are assisting with the case, Cook said. "They can provide polygraphs and are helping with the interviews," he said.

Tucker announced plans today for a memorial service, which will be held from 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 11 at Burns Park in North Little Rock at the Overlook Pavilion, or pavilion No. 11.

"We're asking everyone to dress casual and bring lawn chairs ... People may stand up and talk about Beau if they want," she said.

"It's a celebration of his life ... it's outside because Beau loved to have fun and loved the outdoors."

Tucker said a balloon release is planned.

Ramsey had suffered from an addiction to methamphetamine. Tucker said she believes he was not using the drug at the time her son went missing, however.

Tucker said meth affects all spectrums of society.

"This is happening to a lot of young people and it shouldn't be happening," she said. "Meth is ruining lives ... . It affects people who go to church, people who don't go, businessmen ... ."

Ramsey graduated from Benton High School and was a football cheerleader for a while at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

Tucker said she last spoke to her son on Aug. 15 of last year and began to worry when she did not hear from him for a few days after that.
http://www.bentoncourier.com/articles/2005/05/25/news/04znews.txt
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xx 'Starting over' in investigation of death
« Reply #14 on: May 27th, 2005, 11:15pm »

A Grant County Sheriff's Department official said authorities "basically are just starting all over again" as they investigate the August 2004 death of Beau Ramsey of Benton.

Ramsey's skeletal remains were discovered less than two weeks ago in a densely wooded area in northern Grant County near the Saline County line. The state Crime Lab this week used dental records in identifying the remains as Ramsey's.

Ramsey was reported missing on Aug. 17 of last year. He was 23.

"We're re-interviewing everybody Saline County (authorities) interviewed when this was a missing person case," Grant County Detective Nathan Cook said Thursday.

"We're diligently interviewing friends, family members and associates. We're going over timelines. We're basically back to ground zero, starting over. Everything took a different turn when this became a death investigation."

Grant County Sheriff Sam Pruitt said authorities are treating the case as a homicide. "We're attempting to get to the bottom of what happened," he said.

Cook said Arkansas State Police investigators are assisting in the case.

"They (state police) have more resources than a county sheriff's office," Cook said, "and we're certainly taking advantage of that. We're using whatever means necessary to investigate this death and hopefully come to some conclusion and give the family more closure."

Cook said officials at the Crime Lab are trying to determine a cause of death.

Ramsey's skeletal remains were found Sunday, May 15, by Donna Gentry. She is a friend of Ramsey's mother, Dee Tucker, and had helped several times in the search for Ramsey's body.

Gentry found a pair of blue jeans matching the description of what Ramsey was wearing when we disappeared. She also found a set of keys and authorities found that one of the keys opened the door to an apartment where Ramsey lived at his father's house.

Ramsey's remains were found in a 50-yard by 50-yard area about 200 yards north of Baxter Trail near Benning Road in northern Grant County. The location is near Arkansas 35 and is 3.1 miles from where Ramsey's motorcycle was located on Aug. 18 of last year.

The area had been searched previously but authorities said thick underbrush may have prevented them from making a discovery.

Gentry said she searched on May 15 because she had some free time and wanted to continue to look for Ramsey's body.

Ramsey graduated from Benton High School and was a football cheerleader for a while at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Tucker acknowledged that her son suffered for a while from an addiction to methamphetamine.

Tucker said she last spoke to her son on Aug. 15 of last year. She said she began to worry when she did not hear from him for a few days.

Tucker said a memorial service will be held from 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 11, at Burns Park in North Little Rock at the Overlook Pavilion (pavilion No. 11).

"We're asking everyone to dress casual and bring lawn chairs. People may stand up and talk about Beau if they want," she said, noting, "It's a celebration of his life and it's outside because Beau loved to have fun and loved the outdoors."

Tucker said a balloon release is planned.
http://www.bentoncourier.com/articles/2005/05/27/news/04tnews.txt
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