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xx The Doe Network
« Thread started on: Sep 10th, 2004, 6:25pm »

The Doe Network Website Address:
http://www.doenetwork.org

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xx Re: The Doe Network
« Reply #1 on: Oct 12th, 2004, 06:43am »

Amateur sleuths warm up to "ColdCases "
Internet group investigates missing persons and unidentified victims
BY DOUGLAS QUAN
The Press Enterprise

April 20, 2003 - (revised numbers October, 2004 by Todd Matthews)

Most people reeled when news broke in January that a woman's headless, handless body was found dumped off the Ortega Highway.
Kathy Rivera took it as a call to action.
The 50+-year-old grandmother and retired corrections officer is a member of a growing Internet-based group of amateur sleuths trying to crack John and Jane Doe cases around the world.

They take whatever details are known about an unidentified body, and hit the computers, scouring missing persons Web sites for potential matches.
"There's so many thousands who have never been found. It's heartbreaking," Rivera said. While the recent discovery of missing Utah teenager Elizabeth Smart encourages Rivera, she knows that many people who disappear are either never found or end up dead.

In the early stages of the investigation into the Ortega Highway case, authorities had little to work with. Investigators said the woman was white, probably in her late 20s to late 30s, 5-feet-8-inches to 5-feet-10-inches tall, 165 to 175 pounds, with red or strawberry blond hair.
First, Rivera posted newspaper articles about the story to the network. Then she began to search missing-person sites across California to see if anyone matched that description. She found none, so she started looking at sites in Oregon. She said she found one possible match and forwarded it to investigators.
Investigators thanked her for the information, she said. As it turned out, the woman, Jane Bautista, had been living in Riverside and her two sons were charged with murdering her.

0ver 1,100 members

Still, Rivera didn't think she had wasted her time. Simply getting the word out on a Doe case, getting people talking, helps.
The discussion group she belongs to, ColdCases - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/coldcases/ started in 1999 and has since grown to over 1,100 members. In 2001, members of that group formed the Doe Network www.doenetwork.us, an Internet-based resource devoted to missing people and unidentified victims.
The volunteers who run the nonprofit network, which covers the U.S., Canada and Europe, say the network has played a role in cracking more than 20 cold cases.
The site publicizes numerous cases involving missing persons and unidentified victims, and contains links to law enforcement, missing-person sites and newspaper articles.
"It helps to keep a case from being cold," said Todd Matthews - JTMatthews@TwLakes.Net, the Doe Network's media director based in Tennessee.
"You can tie cases together and cross-publicize them. You might find a clue that way," he added.
Among the network's members are a group of forensic artists who donate their time to create computer-aged photos and three-dimensional busts.

Mixed response

Members admit that sometimes law enforcement agencies don't take the group seriously. But others are willing to share information with the network, Matthews said.
Deputy Rick Bogan, of the Riverside County Sheriff-Coroner's office, whose Web site is linked to the network's Web site, said the networks can be a valuable resource for the families of missing people.
"I'm glad they're out there doing things," Bogan said.
Like many members, Rivera has a personal connection to a missing-person case. A close friend of hers went missing in 1984. The case went unsolved for several years until police said a man confessed to her murder.
Rivera said she devotes a part of each day reading e-mails from other members of the discussion group. If there's a case she's particularly keen on, she can spend hours on the computer doing research.
While she's especially sensitive to cases of unidentified children, Rivera said all cases deserve equal attention.
"It doesn't matter if they're adults or children, they're somebody's children."

The Doe Network has been a part of more than 20 solved cases.

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xx The Doe Network Assists in Solving Cold Case
« Reply #2 on: Nov 5th, 2004, 06:39am »

EAST HAVEN — She left this world in a pauper’s casket with no name and an unmarked grave — far less, some say, than she deserved.


While nearby family plots radiate with colorful blossoms and telltale tombstones, her barren plot rests in the shadows of Hamden’s State Street Cemetery alongside a rusty chain-link fence and a clump of crabgrass.

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"I get calls all the time for (unidentified) people who died in the 1970s to put in a stone for them," said the cemetery’s caretaker, Randy Guevin. But no one, he said, ever calls to identify this woman, known to East Haven police as Jane Doe. The woman’s strangled body was found by a truck driver on a rainy Aug. 16, 1975, floating in a drainage ditch behind the former Bradlees department store on Frontage Road. She was wrapped in a canvas tarpaulin and she was gagged and bound by black antenna wire around her neck, waist and knees. With little evidence to go on except her physical features and the facts of her discovery, authorities have spent the past three decades baffled by the mystery woman. "Obviously, nobody ever missed her because they never took the time to report her missing," Police Sgt. Robert Flodquist said. Regardless, police said they are determined to put a name, aside from Jane Doe, at the top of the slim manila envelope containing her entire case history in hopes of piecing together her story and nabbing her killer. "It’s a very difficult case," Flodquist said. "In most homicides, you know the victim and are (only) searching for the murderer." At the time of her death, however, police were unable immediately to pinpoint her identity because of the nonexistence of DNA testing and any fingerprint records belonging to her. The white, 20-something’s dental chart, which showed probable orthodontic care, also proved fruitless, since it did not match any of those contained in the dozens of missing person reports that poured in from police departments nationwide. The possibility that she had plastic surgery on her nose may also have thrown off anyone who knew her natural facial features. The absence of a driver’s license solidified her anonymity. As a result, police have spent the last 29 years "working backward" in an attempt to determine Jane Doe’s personality, hometown and acquaintances. Her murderer left police with slim evidence at the scene. Police believe she was killed somewhere else and dumped on Frontage Road. No fingerprints. No footprints. Not even a single eyelash was left behind. Only dried white paint spots on the tarpaulin, Flodquist noted, might indicate the murderer had connections with the painting trade. Police still ponder varied versions of how the 125-pound woman’s 5-foot 6-inch body wound up in a 2-foot-deep open culvert. "The odds are against us, but we have a lot of confidence and … hope we’ll be able to solve it," Flodquist said. Some police officers, including Flodquist, have speculated that the hazel-eyed brunette was a transient and possibly dumped in the shopping plaza by someone in a vehicle that could quickly flee on nearby Interstate 95. Other police sources said her bundled body may have been "stuffed inside a 30-inch drain pipe upstream of the drainage ditch," which heavy rains later washed down the small river. Still others wondered if she fell victim to a gangland killing. Just two weeks before her body was found, authorities discovered a convicted bookkeeper floating in the Quinnipiac River, wrapped in a sleeping bag tied with chains and ropes. Despite all the possibilities, no leads ever verified the hypotheses. Only her cause of death remains certain. As indicated in an autopsy report, Jane Doe died of asphyxiation by suffocation at least five days before the truck driver’s chance encounter. Mostly, police have been at the mercy of others to provide any new leads, which Flodquist said have been sporadic at best. According to Inspector Guy Nappi, who has been with the department for 37 years, the department’s most promising lead regarding the suspect’s potential identity surfaced a couple of years ago. A serial killer in a Maine jail who was known for killing women and roaming Vermont, Connecticut and New Hampshire sparked local authorities’ attention. "He alluded to being in the Greater New Haven area (around the time of Doe’s death), and he mentioned something about being in a shopping area," said Nappi. But police eventually considered it a dead end because he never admitted to murdering or harming anyone at that time. His conversation also "wasn’t too lucid," Nappi noted. A sketch of the woman was submitted in the 1990s to The Doe Network Web site (www.doenetwork.us). The site assists law enforcement in North America, Australia and Europe to solve cold cases by featuring photos and information regarding unidentified and missing persons. In late July, one Web surfer who viewed the local composite rejuvenated police hope, said Flodquist. The unidentified tipster told police the woman resembled a Bell telephone co-worker of hers in the 1970s and provided an undisclosed name. However, police were unable to locate the named person’s family and have since lost hope it will result in some answers. Until they find otherwise, Guevin said Jane Doe will always have a home at the Hamden cemetery where her remains are cared for. If anyone has information about this case, contact the East Haven detective division at 468-3827. All tips can remain anonymous

http://www.nhregister.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13110909&BRD=1281&PAG=461&dept_id=517515&rfi=6
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xx The Doe Network Helps in Missing Person Case
« Reply #3 on: Nov 11th, 2004, 1:31pm »

WASHINGTON -- Maryland State Police are looking for the person who killed Tonya Marie Gardner more than eight years ago.

Part of the problem is that they didn't even know she had been murdered until recently, when they got some unexpected help from a local woman who spends her free time researching cold cases.

Gardner disappeared on July 3, 1996.
"Ms. Gardner was actually supposed to leave on the weekend of July 3, 1996, to go on a family trip with her husband to visit some family in Kentucky," said Sgt. Jack McCauley of the Maryland State Police.

Her husband told police that she had changed her mind and did not go, and, that when he returned to their home in Reidsville, Pa., a few days later, she was gone.

"We're still trying to figure out what happened to her during that time," McCauley said.

It was in a clump of trees that highway maintenance workers found Gardner's body on Aug. 27, 1996. At the time, and for a long time afterward, no one knew it was Gardner because her body was badly decomposed. No one knew until about eight years later, when Kylen Johnson got involved in the case.

"How can you just take somebody and just throw them away like trash?" Johnson said.

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Cold Case: Doe Network




Johnson is the Maryland Coordinator for an international Web site called The Doe Network, a site dedicated to identifying Jane and John Does -- unidentified victims.

She spends spare hours every day trying to solve cold cases, and she's already helped to close three.

"I'll get up early in the morning and I'll just read the newspapers and I'll look for missing person stories," Johnson said.

She compares those stories with lists of unidentified remains.

"You just want to see these cases solved so bad that you just can't go to sleep," Johnson said.

Tonya Gardner was a Jane Doe when she was discovered off the Route 94 ramp to westbound I-70 in Lisbon, Md.

She was identified only as a white female with a significant scar on the back of her neck from surgery to correct a rare brain defect.

"She had a very rare disorder. It's called Arnold Chiari, which way less than 20,000 people have. And I was just like, 'How can this woman be unidentified?'" Johnson said.

And then, last spring, she found a missing person's report about Tonya Gardner on a Pennsylvania police Web site.

"She had a distinct scar on the back of her neck," Johnson said.

Kylen Johnson showed the link to the Maryland State Police and dental records confirmed that the woman found in the woods was Tonya Gardner.

Law enforcement officers appreciate her help and her dedication.

"Kylen Johnson deserves a lot of credit," McCauley said.

"It's the oddest feeling in the world. You have a weird bond with this person," Johnson said.

"There is a suspect, but we're not going to name the suspect right now," McCauley said.

"I would love to see the person who probably did this to her just rot in the deepest pits of the Maryland State Prison," Johnson said.

"I think we're pretty close. I really do. Thanks to her," McCauley said.

Sgt. Jack McCauley would like any extra help in solving this cold case. Anyone with information should call the Maryland State Police Criminal Investigation Division at (410) 290-0050, extension 142
http://www.nbc4.com/news/3907193/detail.html
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xx Group Helps Police Solve Cold Cases
« Reply #4 on: Nov 17th, 2004, 11:29am »

WASHINGTON -- Maryland State Police are looking for the person who killed Tonya Marie Gardner more than eight years ago.

Part of the problem is that they didn't even know she had been murdered until recently, when they got some unexpected help from a local woman who spends her free time researching cold cases.

Gardner disappeared on July 3, 1996.




"Ms. Gardner was actually supposed to leave on the weekend of July 3, 1996, to go on a family trip with her husband to visit some family in Kentucky," said Sgt. Jack McCauley of the Maryland State Police.

Her husband told police that she had changed her mind and did not go, and, that when he returned to their home in Reidsville, Pa., a few days later, she was gone.

"We're still trying to figure out what happened to her during that time," McCauley said.

It was in a clump of trees that highway maintenance workers found Gardner's body on Aug. 27, 1996. At the time, and for a long time afterward, no one knew it was Gardner because her body was badly decomposed. No one knew until about eight years later, when Kylen Johnson got involved in the case.

"How can you just take somebody and just throw them away like trash?" Johnson said.

FeedRoom


Cold Case: Doe Network




Johnson is the Maryland Coordinator for an international Web site called The Doe Network, a site dedicated to identifying Jane and John Does -- unidentified victims.

She spends spare hours every day trying to solve cold cases, and she's already helped to close three.

"I'll get up early in the morning and I'll just read the newspapers and I'll look for missing person stories," Johnson said.

She compares those stories with lists of unidentified remains.

"You just want to see these cases solved so bad that you just can't go to sleep," Johnson said.

Tonya Gardner was a Jane Doe when she was discovered off the Route 94 ramp to westbound I-70 in Lisbon, Md.

She was identified only as a white female with a significant scar on the back of her neck from surgery to correct a rare brain defect.

"She had a very rare disorder. It's called Arnold Chiari, which way less than 20,000 people have. And I was just like, 'How can this woman be unidentified?'" Johnson said.

And then, last spring, she found a missing person's report about Tonya Gardner on a Pennsylvania police Web site.

"She had a distinct scar on the back of her neck," Johnson said.

Kylen Johnson showed the link to the Maryland State Police and dental records confirmed that the woman found in the woods was Tonya Gardner.

Law enforcement officers appreciate her help and her dedication.

"Kylen Johnson deserves a lot of credit," McCauley said.

"It's the oddest feeling in the world. You have a weird bond with this person," Johnson said.

"There is a suspect, but we're not going to name the suspect right now," McCauley said.

"I would love to see the person who probably did this to her just rot in the deepest pits of the Maryland State Prison," Johnson said.

"I think we're pretty close. I really do. Thanks to her," McCauley said.

Sgt. Jack McCauley would like any extra help in solving this cold case. Anyone with information should call the Maryland State Police Criminal Investigation Division at (410) 290-0050, extension 142.

You can also find out more information about solving cases of missing people at DoeNetwork.org and MarylandMissing.com
http://www.nbc4.com/news/3907193/detail.html
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xx NCIC Statistics
« Reply #5 on: Jul 24th, 2005, 12:07am »

NCIC Statistics
UPDATED (Current as of June 30, 2005 indexing)

According to the FBI-NCIC there are (approximately) 105,978 Missing Persons listed in their system. Children and adult. (Down slightly from last months total of 106,097)

There are (approximately) 5,911 Unidentified Persons listed their system. Children and adult.
(Up slightly from last months total of 5,889)

We will post regular revisions as they are made available to us from the FBI-NCIC.
__________________________________________________
_________
The NCIC statistics cover the USA, Canada and their territories.

Some experts feel that these are only 10-50% of the actual numbers as not all cases are reported to the NCIC by law enforcement. We hope to encourage more agencies to take full advantage of this available resource.

For the family members of the missing, it is imperative that they properly report and request that their loved one's case is indeed listed in the NCIC. The law enforcement agency in charge are the only ones that can submit the case to the NCIC.

Tips from the Outpost For Hope:
http://www.outpostforhope.org/missi...s/checklist.htm
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Updates posted monthly at www.TheLostAndTheFound.com / www.LFRGC.org
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Please pass along this message to whomever
might have a need for this information.
If everyone would just forward to one
other person, the total reach would be doubled!
__________________________________________

Giving faces to the dead:
www.ProjectEDAN.us
__________________________________________

Todd Matthews

www.TentGirl.com
Director ~ www.ProjectEDAN.us &
www.TheLostAndTheFound.com
Media Director ~ www.DoeNetwork.us
www.OutpostForHope.org &
www.FourTheKids.org
Member ~ www.TheIAI.org
www.NomisProject.com
931-397-3893



Naming the Nameless Dead
www.crimemagazine.com/04/doe,0323.htm

"...there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; and hid, that shall not be known."
- Matthew 10:26

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xx From Todd Matthews
« Reply #6 on: Aug 29th, 2005, 3:42pm »

NCIC Statistics - provided by the FBI-NCIC for media relations
UPDATED ~
Current as of the July 31, 2005 indexing

According to the FBI-NCIC there are (approximately) 106,615 Missing Persons listed in their system. Children and adult. (Up from last months total of 105,978)

There are (approximately) 5,931 Unidentified Persons listed their system. Children and adult.
(Up slightly from last months total of 5,911)

Gender specifics - as of August 2005 - are 1,474 active unidentified female entries,
4,264 active unidentified male entries and 213 active unidentified unknown sex entries.
__________________________________________________________________

Updates posted monthly at www.TheLostAndTheFound.com / www.LFRGC.org
(State specific information avaible upon request.)

We promote many great volunteer organizations listed on the Lost & Found. Please visit to find someone out there who can be of help for your own missing persons cases.
__________________________________________________________________

The NCIC statistics reflect the USA, Canada and their territories.

Some experts feel that these are only 10-50% of the actual numbers as not all cases are reported to the NCIC by law enforcement. We hope to encourage more agencies to take full advantage of this available resource.

There are many cases that are not yet listed with the NCIC.

For the family members of the missing, it is imperative that they properly report and request that their loved one's case is indeed listed in the NCIC. The law enforcement agency in charge are the only ones that can submit the case to the NCIC.

Important Tips for family members of the lost from the Outpost For Hope:
http://www.outpostforhope.org/missing_loved_ones/checklist.htm

__________________________________________________________________
Please pass along this message to whomever
might have a need for this information. Specific
state statistics are available upon request.
__________________________________________

Giving faces to the dead:
www.ProjectEDAN.us
Forensic Art Service -
Free to Law Enforcement
_____________________

Todd Matthews
JTMatthews@Twlakes.Net
www.TentGirl.com
Director ~ www.ProjectEDAN.us &
www.TheLostAndTheFound.com
Media Director ~ www.DoeNetwork.us
www.OutpostForHope.org &
www.FourTheKids.org
Member ~ www.TheIAI.org
www.NomisProject.com
931-397-3893




The www.DoeNetwork.us :
Naming the Nameless Dead
www.crimemagazine.com/04/doe,0323.htm


Technology Criminology
www.TechniCriminology.info


"...there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; and hid, that shall not be known."
- Matthew 10:26

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xx Distance thwarts search for the vanished
« Reply #7 on: Sep 21st, 2006, 09:57am »

Dennis Webb


GLENWOOD SPRINGS — When a Garfield County sheriff investigator released clues in April related to an unidentified man whose body was found in the Flat Tops in 2004, the story was reported in media as far away as Grand Junction and Denver.

That’s all well and good if the man is from Colorado. But it’s of limited value if he’s from some other state where people don’t watch the Denver news on TV.

To Pat Champeau, a semi-retired Wisconsin private investigator who specializes in looking for missing persons, it points to a glaring gap. If someone from her state is killed, and the body is dropped off in Colorado, it can be hard for investigators to make the connection.

“My state has a missing story, your state has a found story, the twain never meet,” Champeau said.

Champeau is one of thousands of people around the country who devote themselves to trying to connect the dots between missing cases and found bodies.

“Your guy is one of over 5,000 unidentified human beings in this country,” Champeau said.

Internet searches
Local investigators dealing with unidentified remains are getting an increased amount of help these days from faraway places, thanks to the Internet. Both the Flat Tops case and that of remains found on Red Mountain near Glenwood Springs in 2003 are now listed on the Doe Network, at www.doenetwork.us.

The site is an international information center on missing persons and unidentified remains. It includes indexes to both categories, often including photos. A picture of a facial reconstruction done on the Red Mountain skull is on the site, as are images of a notebook, boots and other items found with the body in the Flat Tops.

The Flat Tops case also was mentioned in Yahoo’s Cold Cases discussion group. All the attention has resulted in people such as Champeau pondering what evidence found with the remains might mean.

For example, Champeau is particularly intrigued by the reference in the notebook to “Lib,” which may be a nickname for Libby, and which Champeau thinks could be a crucial clue to helping solve the case.

Champeau, who formerly was a Doe Network member, now operates her own blog that she said is devoted to the “lost but not forgotten.”

She says she remains frustrated by the challenge of linking missing persons and found remains. Even the Internet is of limited value in getting information out in a more widespread manner to the general public.

“You have a lot of people with very good intentions, but there are limitations. There’s no national way to get these faces out currently,” she said.

TV shows such as “Unsolved Mysteries” and “America’s Most Wanted” have been of some help, she said. While the Doe Network Web site also has been valuable, she said, one frustration for her is that it only publishes pictures of people who have been missing at least seven years.

Todd Matthews, a Doe Network spokesman and the man who solved what is known as the Tent Girl case, pointed to the sheer volume of missing people — more than 100,000 nationally.

He believes the Doe Network is best off concentrating on older cases that police haven’t been able to solve. With more than 1,400 cybersleuths as members, the Doe Network has solved or helped solve about three dozen cases.

Matthews said cases are now easier for people to investigate. The Internet has simplified things, such as tracking down the name of a sheriff to talk to in another state, checking the archives of a distant newspaper, or comparing notes on a case with people living around the world.

“It just seems like now there’s so many resources out there that weren’t there years ago. If I had those the Tent Girl might not have taken 10 years” to solve, he said.

Driven by a mystery
Some people become involved in organizations such as the Doe Network because they have a missing family member, Matthews said. A lot of others, such as him, have a specific case that has haunted them and driven them, and sometimes has become known by a name drawn from its circumstances.

For Matthews, that case was the Tent Girl. Matthews’ father-in-law, a water-well driller named Wilbur Riddle, found her body wrapped in a green tarp, near a creek off a dirt road in Kentucky.

The year was 1968, before Matthews had even been born. In 1987, while working as a quality auditor at a Tennessee auto plant and dating his future wife, he became intrigued by Riddle’s discovery.

Hounded by the thought that some family was missing a loved one, he worked the case diligently over the next decade. He finally solved it in 1998 when he came across a missing persons Web site that mentioned a Lexington woman who seemed to match the description of the Tent Girl. DNA tests confirmed his suspicions.

The case that has possessed Champeau has yet to come to any satisfactory ending. After reading a newspaper story, she became interested in trying to identify a woman whose remains were found in Wisconsin in 1999. X-rays show the woman, who had been developmentally disabled, was tortured for four weeks before her death, Champeau said.

Somebody “has gotten away with it for seven years” because about the only people to see a facial reconstruction of the woman live in southeast Wisconsin, Champeau said.

Some people follow missing and unidentified persons cases for other reasons. Jack Sweeney, who lives in China, e-mailed the Glenwood Springs Post Independent about the Flat Tops case, wanting to know what time of day the remains were found.

Sweeney researches, practices and teaches an ancient Chinese astronomical science that is sometimes used by police there. Knowing the timing of certain events can yield clues such as the circumstances of a death, the year the deceased was born, and clues to the killer’s identity if someone was killed, Sweeney said via e-mail.

“I have e-mailed Garfield Sheriff Lou Vallario, but he chose not to respond, which is not surprising, since most police don’t like to reveal anything about murder investigations beyond what has already appeared in the press,” Sweeney said.

Sheriff Detective Don Breier, the investigator on the case, said he hadn’t heard about Sweeney, and added that his approach sounded “kind of curious.”

Though Breier said he tries to generally keep an open mind, both he and Vallario said they tend to be skeptical about some things, such as the use of psychics on cases.

“When they start telling me what the winning lottery numbers are and who killed Jimmy Hoffa I’ll become a believer,” Breier said.


Vail Daily, Vail, Colorado

http://www.vaildaily.com/article/20060920/NEWS/60920003
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