Board Logo
« Carole Sund/Carrington Foundation »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jan 21st, 2018, 08:19am


The Lost & The Found Global Resource Center
Please be advised that this msg. forum is private owned and operated.
Therefore we cannot be responsible for listings on this website and any problems there may be with the agency in question.
We also reserve the right to add to or take away from this list at any given time.
All listings on this board are at the discretion of the board owner.

« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1  Notify Send Topic Print
 sticky  Author  Topic: Carole Sund/Carrington Foundation  (Read 3226 times)
FindCarrie
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

For Carrie Always


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 6967
xx Carole Sund/Carrington Foundation
« Thread started on: Sep 10th, 2004, 6:28pm »

The Carole Sund/Carrington Foundation was created after the senseless murders of Carole Sund, Julianna Sund, and Silvina Pelosso bodies were found after visiting Yosmite park in Feb. 1999. They were murded by a handyman who worked at the lodge where they were staying. After the disappearances and murders, the family of Carole Sund develped one of the most successful orginaztions to assist families with rewards to help bring those who are missing and murdered back home.

Carole Sund/Carrington Foundation Website:
www.carolesundfoundation.com

User Image
« Last Edit: Oct 19th, 2004, 09:27am by FindCarrie » User IP Logged

Caring About All Missing & Murdered People
Please visit www.FindCarrieCulberson.Com
And www.AngelGardenOfHope.Com
My group inspired to help others because of Carrie.
See also our missing & murdered person blog
http://findcarrie.blogspot.com
FindCarrie
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

For Carrie Always


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 6967
xx GRIEVING FAMILY SETS UP REWARD FUND TO ASSIST POOR
« Reply #1 on: Oct 19th, 2004, 09:29am »

Even though the bodies of their loved ones have been found, Francis and Carole Carrington are not ready to retreat into privacy.

The grieving parents of Carole Sund, whose body was found in a burnt out rental car after a February trip to Yosemite, have established a reward trust fund in their daughter's name and are seeding it with $200,000. The fund, which they hope will attract corporate money, will help other families offer reward money for information that would lead to finding missing relatives.


The Carringtons said they firmly believe their initial offer of $250,000 for information about their family members brought fast attention -- and ultimately key information -- that led to the discovery of Carole Sund, her daughter Juliana and family friend Silvina Pelosso.

``It is the only good we can get out of this. If you were a farmworker and someone takes your daughter, you don't get the information and the attention that we got,'' said Francis Carrington, father of 42-year-old Carole and grandfather of 15-year-old Juliana, called Julie by family and friends.

Carrington, a Eureka real estate developer, has made his fortune with shopping centers all over the country, but his roots are in Santa Rosa, where his father built homes. Saturday he stood with his wife and Silvina's mother, Raquel Pelosso, in the front of the Holiday Inn hotel in Modesto to announce the creation of the reward fund. It was a day after learning that all three of their missing loved ones are dead, ending an ordeal that began Feb. 16, when the three women failed to show up for a rendezvous with Carole's husband at San Francisco airport.

``There is not much we can do to help Julie, Carole or Silvie right now,'' Carrington said. ``There's a lot we can do to prevent this from happening in the future by putting up a fund so we might catch these people the first time and stop families from going through the misery that we have.''

Carrington opened The Carole Sund Carrington Memorial Missing Person Criminal Apprehension Reward Fund by placing the $200,000 in a trust account at the Bank of America in Modesto.

``This is a move in a direction we have been forced to take,'' said Ken Sund, Windsor resident and brother-in-law of Carole Sund.

Sund said the fund is a tax-deductible, nonprofit trust account. Trustees are Carrington, Sund and Ron Caton, another brother-in-law, and FBI Chaplain Mark O'Sullivan, who has been counseling the Carringtons and Pelossos throughout the ordeal that began when the three women were reported missing after their President's Day weekend trip to Yosemite.

Caton was regional vice president for commercial banking for Wells Fargo Bank in Santa Rosa before following his career to Arizona, where he now lives with his family.

The fund ``is so poor people can have what they need,'' Carrington said.

``This is being set up with the purpose of fighting back to what's happened to too many people,'' said Sund.

For weeks the case of the missing trio that captivated the nation was stalled, and search efforts were suspended. The break came on March 18, when a 40year-old Long Barn resident stumbled across Carole Sund's badly burned Pontiac Grand Prix off Highway 108 between the Sierra foothill communities of Sierra Village and Long Barn.

The bodies of Carole Sund and Silvina Pelosso were found in the trunk of the car. On Thursday, the FBI found Julie Sund's body on a vista overlooking Don Pedro Reservoir. The FBI would not say how they were led to her body.

Nevertheless, the Carringtons and others associated with the case firmly believe that they might have been in the dark about their missing relatives for years without the reward money and exhaustive media exposure across the country and in Argentina.

Carrington said he was moved to learn at a vigil held for the missing women two weeks ago that so many families had relatives missing.

``Some had children who had been missing for years and years,'' he said.

``We feel this will put a lot of the criminals in a spot where they won't be able to do this anymore,'' Carrington said.

The fund will be temporarily housed out of Carrington's business in Eureka. The trustees will set up criteria for families requesting funds. It is hoped that others will donate money to help the fund grow.

``We think there is about 99 percent of the people in this country who are loving and caring. The other 1 percent we want to put away forever,'' said Carole Carrington, grandmother and mother of two of the victims.

In Santa Rosa and Eureka, prayers were offered for the family in church services.

Complete Article:
http://www.pressdemo.com/evergreen/sunds/0328rewardfund.html
User IP Logged

Caring About All Missing & Murdered People
Please visit www.FindCarrieCulberson.Com
And www.AngelGardenOfHope.Com
My group inspired to help others because of Carrie.
See also our missing & murdered person blog
http://findcarrie.blogspot.com
FindCarrie
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

For Carrie Always


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 6967
xx Stayner admits to killings
« Reply #2 on: Oct 19th, 2004, 09:31am »

SACRAMENTO -- Motel handyman Cary Stayner, in a jailhouse interview, on Monday admitted killing Carole and Juli Sund and family friend Silvina Pelosso as well the Yosemite naturalist last week.
Stayner, 37, told San Francisco's KBWB-TV, Channel 20, that he had dreamed about killing women for 30 years. Stayner did not appear on camera.
"I am guilty," Stayner told a KBWB reporter. "I did murder Carole Sund, Juli Sund, Silvina Pelosso and Joie Armstrong....None of the women were sexually abused in any way."
He said that in mid-February he strangled Pelosso and Carole Sund in their room at the Cedar Lodge in El Portal, just west of Yosemite National Park, and then took Juli Sund to Don Pedro Reservoir, north of El Portal, where he killed her early the next morning.
He said he abandoned the Sunds' rental car with the bodies of Pelosso and Carole Sund in it, returning two days later to burn evidence and retrieve Carole Sund's wallet, which he dumped in Modesto to confuse authorities.
Stayner said he was the person who tipped the FBI to the whereabouts of Juli Sund's body by sending an anonymous letter.
He said he thought he had gotten away with the crimes and did not leave the area for fear of drawing attention to himself. That changed when last week he met Armstrong, 26, a Yosemite naturalist, and struck up a chance conversation with her. He said he could not resist the urge to kill her when he realized she was alone.
To his victims' families, he said, "I am sorry their loved ones were where they were when they were. I wish I could have controlled myself and not done what I did."
FBI agent Nick Rossi said he could not say whether Stayner's statements were consistent with what he has told investigators.
But law enforcement sources earlier Monday told the Associated Press and several other news organizations that Stayner had confessed to the Sund-Pelosso killings and gave details that only the killer would know. The Los Angeles Times reported that Stayner told federal authorities he acted alone and methodically covered up his crimes.
"He's a Ted Bundy type," said one source familiar with the murder investigation, referring to a serial killer who stalked young women in the Pacific Northwest and Florida. "The bottom line is that this guy, if left unchecked, was going to kill again -- and again and again."
In addition, an FBI affidavit filed Monday in conjunction with a Sacramento court appearance by Stayner said he admitted to killing Armstrong near her cabin inside Yosemite last Wednesday.
"Stayner provided details about the crime that are not generally known outside law enforcement, and which corroborate his confession," the affidavit said.
The FBI has declared Stayner the prime suspect in the slayings of the Sunds and Pelosso, who were visiting Yosemite from their Eureka home.

Complete Article:
http://www.pressdemocrat.com/evergreen/sunds/61.html
User IP Logged

Caring About All Missing & Murdered People
Please visit www.FindCarrieCulberson.Com
And www.AngelGardenOfHope.Com
My group inspired to help others because of Carrie.
See also our missing & murdered person blog
http://findcarrie.blogspot.com
FindCarrie
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

For Carrie Always


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 6967
xx Perma-parenting
« Reply #3 on: Oct 19th, 2004, 09:33am »

It's the mythical promise of parenting. You do your 18 or 21 years, guide your children through the ups and downs, and then let them go. They're grown-ups, on their own, to do as they please. To succeed. To make a mess of it.

It is never really that way, of course. Many parents continue to help out their adult children, and many want it that way. Experts call it ''perma-parenting,'' a result of small families and the investment people make in their children. They say it's a recent phenomenon. Although it often helps the child to have a parent bail him or her out, the detour keeps parents from moving into the next stage of their lives, some experts argue.

Nowhere is perma-parenting more on display, in an exaggerated, painful way, than in the dramas that swirl around violent crime. Whether the child is a victim or accused of a crime, the parental bond often compels mothers and fathers to come to their child's defense. It is then that all self-help books, all parenting expertise can be thrown out the window.

On most days in a Redwood City court, Sharon Rocha, Laci Peterson's mother, sits a few dozen feet from Scott Peterson's parents, Lee and Jackie Peterson. One is there for the memory of her child. The others are there for the future of their son.

Scott Peterson says he did not kill his wife and their unborn child. To pay for their son's costly defense, the Petersons have sold their vacation house in the mountains and they and Scott's siblings have mortgaged their houses and forked over their savings, according to People magazine.

''We're standing beside him 200 percent,'' Jackie Peterson told People in June. On many days, Jackie Peterson is in court, carrying oxygen for her acute bronchitis.

The families' turmoil surfaced briefly last week during a break in the Peterson trial when Lee Peterson and Ron Grantski, Laci Peterson's stepfather, reportedly sparred verbally. The tensions between the two families continued, and court officials considered repositioning where the families sit in the courtroom.

(The Petersons declined to be interviewed for this story. Sharon Rocha did not return calls.)

''I'm proud to say Scott's my son,'' Lee Peterson said when he took the stand.

Criminal history is filled with parents standing up for their adult children no matter what, or standing in for them after they've been victimized. They carry the flame of the child. They hope to humanize him or her to an indifferent, sometimes hostile public.

''It's the agony and ecstasy of parenting,'' says Jane Adams, a social psychologist and author of ''When Our Grown Kids Disappoint Us: Letting Go of Their Problems, Loving Them Anyway, and Getting on with Our Lives.'' ''You have a relationship that doesn't end until you do.''

Technically, parenting ends when a child turns 18, the age of ''legal majority.'' Then, a child can vote, serve in the military and become legally responsible for his or her actions. That's what people used to think. And with that parenting sensibility came the attitude that ''if you go to jail, I'm no longer responsible for you,'' says David Anderegg, a professor of psychology at Bennington College in Vermont and author of ''Worried All the Time: Overparenting in the Age of Anxiety.''

Then in the 1960s and '70s, something changed. Americans began to have smaller families. Parenthood turned into an endeavor full of expert advice. Children became more of an investment. ''In other cultures children are raised in a group, away from their parents,'' says Susan Newman, a social psychologist and author of ''Nobody's Baby Now.'' ''In this country, once you are in it, you are in it for the long run.''

For some parents, the job never ends. They find themselves still helping their children, who are 30, 40, 50, in ways their own parents would never have done. There are the ''boomerangs,'' who return home after college or after a divorce. There are the grandparents raising grandchildren and the parents who bail out their children financially to help them avert bankruptcy or to buy a house.

Complete Article:
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/living/9749368.htm
User IP Logged

Caring About All Missing & Murdered People
Please visit www.FindCarrieCulberson.Com
And www.AngelGardenOfHope.Com
My group inspired to help others because of Carrie.
See also our missing & murdered person blog
http://findcarrie.blogspot.com
Pages: 1  Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls