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FindCarrie
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xx National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
« Thread started on: Oct 7th, 2004, 3:01pm »

This is the website that sends out those mailers in your PO Boxes and mail that come with junk mail. This organization also is the one who posts the missing people on the boards located in the entrances of Wal-mart stores. This organization only cover children who are missing. The only time an adult is listed is when the adult is the person who has taken the child in question.

This website also has downloadable tickers for your own personal websites.

www.missingkids.com



« Last Edit: Oct 7th, 2004, 3:33pm by FindCarrie » User IP Logged

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xx Lynn students take part in child ID project
« Reply #1 on: Nov 10th, 2004, 06:57am »

Students at the Shoemaker Elementary School last week kicked off the largest child identification project in history, according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC).

As part of the event, a Shoemaker student was named the 200,000th child to undergo identification as part of the CHIP Program.

The Grand Lodge of Masons helped provide ID kits for 400 kids and their families last Friday. The Masons will conduct a school CHIP event every four to five weeks, offering the service to all 14,000 students in the Lynn Public Schools. The undertaking will take three years and is fully funded by the Masons.

Children and their families participating in CHIP receive directly - with no other copies made - an identification kit comprised of fingerprints, a toothprint impression and a DNA cheek swab sample, all conducted by licensed professionals, along with an in-depth and detailed videotape of a question and answer session with their child.

The core of the program is a TV-quality videotape of the child, which captures mannerisms, expressions, speech patterns, profiles of the child, and gives immediate leads to law enforcement officials tracking missing children.

Children are asked questions about their friends, hobbies, favorite and hiding places, and more, all of which provide clues to law enforcement authorities as they search for a missing child.Fingerprints are taken, which are invaluable in tracking lost, missing, or abducted children for investigation, tracking, and prosecution purposes.

The third component of the program is "Toothprints," which record individual tooth characteristics.

Every child's Toothprint is unique - an important aspect since 70 percent of American children are now cavity - and filling-free, creating literally blank dental records for reporting purposes.

An additional key component of Toothprints is the saliva left by the child, which serves as a scent tracer for recovery bloodhound dogs to track the child.

At the event, children are taught to leave a "spit trail" if lost in the woods; or if age appropriate, leave their saliva, fingerprints, and hair behind if abducted.

The most recent addition to the CHIP kit is a DNA cheek swab, which provides DNA material for both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA matching, lasting 20 years when properly frozen in a home freezer.

"With a child being reported missing every 43 seconds in the United States, and with only 3 percent of parents carrying recent full-face photos of their children, it is critical that reliable identification materials be easily accessible," said Dave Harte, founder and director emeritus of the Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts' Comprehensive Child Identification program, which has served nearly 200,000 children and 43 school systems over the last eight years.

"Due to the high-profile abductions of Molly Bish, Elizabeth Smart and Carlie Bruchia, in addition to still-missing Lynn kids Jesus De La Cruz and David Ohlson, combined with the many reported attempted abductions, it is imperative that parents take decisive action to protect their children
http://www.thedailyitemoflynn.com/news/view.bg?articleid=7577
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xx Re: National Center for Missing & Exploited Childr
« Reply #2 on: Dec 10th, 2004, 3:45pm »

The missing and exploited kids have teamed up with life touch pictures. Schools that have their photos with life touch are giving out identification cards. They are really cool, my children came home from school with two each, one for each parent. The program is called smile safe kids. Here is a link were you can read about it.

http://www.lifetouch.com/about/index.aspx?id=192
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xx Re: National Center for Missing & Exploited Childr
« Reply #3 on: Dec 10th, 2004, 4:18pm »

on Dec 10th, 2004, 3:45pm, klek27 wrote:
The missing and exploited kids have teamed up with life touch pictures. Schools that have their photos with life touch are giving out identification cards. They are really cool, my children came home from school with two each, one for each parent. The program is called smile safe kids. Here is a link were you can read about it.

http://www.lifetouch.com/about/index.aspx?id=192


KK,

That is COOL. I've got everybody in my office to watch their junk mail for those mail outs that come from the Missing & Exploited each week. They are just a cool organization all around. You'll see their posters inside the Wal-marts on the bulletin board in the walkway.
If you havent already, you should sign up for the email alerts they send out for missing kids. They'll alert you when they are missing and when they are located. Also, glad you posted this. Like to see people branching out and posting on other threads, not just on Carries wink
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xx Article About LifeTouch - KK Told Us About This
« Reply #4 on: Jan 7th, 2005, 11:43pm »

It’s every parent’s worst nightmare — a missing child.


With some 2,000 children reported missing in the United States every day — nearly 800,000 a year according to the U.S. Department of Justice — the nightmare is a reality for many parents.


One program is attempting to help keep children safer by providing free tools to families to assist in the recovery of a missing child.


This rapid-response system and child safety program, SmileSafe Kids, was launched in October and is a partnership between Lifetouch National School Studios and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. It is available free of charge to kindergarten through eighth-grade students in partnering schools.


Experts say that the odds for the safe recovery of a missing child improve significantly if a current portrait of the child is available immediately. This aids law enforcement in taking quick, coordinated and focused action, even in common cases where a child becomes separated from parents or guardians in a public place.


The SmileSafe Kids program contains a rapid-response system that allows Lifetouch, the largest school photographer in North America, to provide a child’s image to NCMEC, in the event of a missing child, if requested by the family, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Lifetouch will provide an image to NCMEC only if it is requested and verified by the child’s parent or guardian.


Sgt. Adam Holland, with the criminal investigations division of the Fort Smith Police Department, said having current photos and updated information is of utmost importance when a child goes missing.


“It’s kind of hard to put into words how important that is,” Holland said. “They can give descriptions and clothing (descriptions), but the one thing most people recognize ... is the face.”


Holland said many people may not have cameras or current photos of their children; those who do sometimes have full-body shots, making it difficult to determine facial details.


“The pictures taken for school are usually upper torso and a little closer in on the face,” Holland said. “It shows the shape of the eyes and smile, something you can’t really describe to a person.”


Parents and guardians will receive two free photo identification cards that include the most current school portrait of their child, vital information from NCMEC on what to do if a child is reported missing and NCMEC’s toll-free number, (800) THE-LOST. The cards also provide a space for parents and guardians to include information about their child’s physical characteristics.


According to NCMEC, one in six children featured in their photo distribution program has been recovered as a direct result of someone recognizing the child’s photo and notifying authorities.


“Time is the enemy in missing child cases so it’s critical that law enforcement be provided with a quality, current photograph immediately,” said Ernie Allen, president and chief executive officer of NCMEC.


“We’re grateful to Lifetouch for creating a program that partners with 30,000 schools offering nearly 20 million free safety IDs to families for use in emergencies,” Allen said. “This program combines prevention with preparedness while offering peace of mind to families.”


Sherri Penix, principal at Euper Lane Elementary School, said it was nice to know that vital information about her fifth-grader would be readily available if needed through the SmileSafe Kids program.


“As a parent myself, to have it right there accessible (is great),” she said. “I keep my children’s pictures in my wallet, but being able to link into a national system is a great idea.”


With many of the elementary schools in the Fort Smith and Van Buren school districts and surrounding areas partnering with Lifetouch, many area parents should have received the photo ID cards.


“Every school that participated with Lifetouch, all the students received the ID cards,” Penix said.


Wayne Horntvedt, president and chief operational officer of Lifetouch, said the organization couldn’t think of a more positive way to use its resources than to assist families, law enforcement and NCMEC to help in the recovery of a missing child.


“Schools are a valued resource in this partnership and a critical element to help to educate and build awareness with families,” Horntvedt said. “It is our hope that this type of public and private partnership can truly make a difference in keeping our kids safer.”


In his capacity as an advocate for child safety issues, Holland said time is of the essence in working on a missing child case.


“We’ve got to be involved immediately,” Holland said, noting that the first few hours are when the chance of a child coming home safe is at its greatest.


Holland said a survey conducted a couple of years ago, based on 621 murder cases where the victim was younger than 18, revealed that time did play a factor in when the victims were killed.


Only 44 percent were killed within one hour, while 74 percent were killed within three hours, Holland said. Ninety-one percent were killed within 24 hours; 99 percent within seven days and 100 percent within 30 days.


Holland will be hosting classes covering child safety issues from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in the community room of the Fort Smith Police Department, 100 S. 10th St. Topics will include abduction, molestation and other types of child exploitation, such as Internet predators, he said.


To make a reservation for the class, call Holland at 709-5129 or e-mail holland@fortsmithpd.org.


Holland said the NCMEC Web site, www.missingkids.com, offers a wealth of information about steps parents can take now to help locate their children in the event they become missing and guidelines to follow in the event that nightmare becomes reality.

http://www.swtimes.com/archive/2005/January/07/features/smile_safe.html
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xx NCMEC Observes Missing Children's Day
« Reply #5 on: May 25th, 2005, 07:19am »

ALEXANDRIA, Va., May 25 /U.S. Newswire/ -- The National Center for Missing & Exploited Childrenr (NCMEC) along with families and child advocates nationwide, today observes National Missing Children's Day.

Proclaimed first by President Ronald Reagan in 1983, May 25 serves as an annual reminder to the nation that everyone can play a part in bringing a missing child home and that child protection must be a national priority.

"May 25th calls attention to the 2,000 children reported missing every day in this country," said Ernie Allen, president and CEO of NCMEC. "We must keep hope alive for the children who are still missing, celebrate with the families whose children have been recovered and empower families with the information they need to keep their children safer."

For more than 20 years, NCMEC's mission has been to help prevent child abduction and sexual exploitation; help find missing children; and assist child victims, their families, and the professionals who serve them.

"In 1990, NCMEC's recovery rate for missing children was 62 percent. Today, it is more than 96 percent. More missing children are coming home than ever before in our nation's history, but more work needs to be done," added Allen.

In light of this important day, NCMEC reminds all parents and guardians of the need for high-quality photographs of their children for use in case of an emergency, and the need for everyone to pay close attention to the posters and photographs of missing children.

"The power of pictures can't be overstated," said Allen. "One in six missing children featured in NCMEC's photo distribution network is recovered as a direct result of someone in the public recognizing the picture and notifying authorities."

Missing Children's Day also highlights the need for child safety education. Parents and guardians should discuss with their children the need to always check first with a trusted adult before going anywhere, accepting anything, or getting into a car with anyone; the importance of not going out alone and always taking a friend; that it's okay to say "no" and tell a trusted adult if someone makes them feel scared, uncomfortable, or confused; and that they always have the right to be safe.

History of the Missing Children's Movement:

Between 1979 and 1981 a series of high-profile missing-children cases became national headlines. Three such cases contributed to the shock of the nation's consciousness bringing attention to the seriousness of child victimization and forever changing the response by law-enforcement agencies to reports of missing children.

On May 25, 1979, Etan Patz disappeared from a New York City street on his way to school. Even before cases of missing children routinely garnered national media attention, Etan's case quickly received a lot of coverage. His father, a professional photographer, disseminated black-and-white photographs of Etan in an effort to find him.

For almost three years national media attention was focused on Atlanta, Georgia, where the bodies of young boys and girls were discovered in lakes, marshes, and ponds along roadside trails. By the time a suspect was arrested and identified in 1981, 29 bodies were recovered. The suspect was apprehended, convicted, and now serves a life sentence in prison.

On July 27, 1981, 6-year-old Adam Walsh disappeared from a Florida shopping mall. His parents, John and Reve Walsh, immediately turned to law-enforcement agencies to help find their son. To their disappointment, there was no coordinated effort among law enforcement to search for Adam on a state or national level, and no organization to help them in their desperation.

"When it came to handling missing-children cases, the United States was a nation of 50 states often acting like 50 separate countries," said Allen. "The tragedies of these children and others exposed a fundamental flaw. There was no coordinated effort between federal, state, and local law enforcement; no national response system in place; and no central resource to help searching families." But all that changed in 1984, when President Ronald Reagan opened the doors of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

The momentum that began with the disappearance of Etan, Adam, and the 29 missing and murdered children of Atlanta led to photographs of missing children on milk cartons and, ultimately, a nationwide movement.

For ways that your community can get involved in this important issue, call NCMEC's hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit http://www.missingkids.com and click on "May 25th National Missing Children's Day."

About the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

NCMEC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. NCMEC's congressionally mandated CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation, has handled more than 300,000 leads. Since its establishment in 1984, NCMEC has assisted law enforcement with more than 106,000 missing child cases, resulting in the recovery of more than 92,000 children. For more information about NCMEC, call its toll-free, 24-hour hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST of visit its web site at http://www.missingkids.com.

http://www.usnewswire.com/

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xx Web kiosks to show missing kids
« Reply #6 on: Jul 28th, 2005, 1:40pm »

Web kiosks to show missing kids


PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania (AP) -- Public Internet kiosks are being used as modern-day milk cartons in an effort to find missing children.

SurferQuest, a Philipsburg, Pennsylvania-based supplier of about 1,000 computer kiosks throughout the United States, is donating screen space to disseminate photos and information provided by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

The kiosks provide public access to the Internet for a fee at places such as hotels and cafes.

When a kiosk is unoccupied, pictures of missing children appear on the screen in space normally reserved for advertising. Passersby can request more information about a missing child or report a sighting without charge.

"It is really important to give a missing child as much exposure as we can after their abduction," said SurferQuest president Kathryn Koning, a mother of four.

One in six missing kids whose picture is advertised is eventually found, said D'Ann Taflin, spokeswoman for the missing children's organization.

"We know that pictures work," Taflin said.

Copyright 2005 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/internet/07/28/kiosks.missing.kids.ap/index.html
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xx Re: National Center for Missing & Exploited Childr
« Reply #7 on: Sep 4th, 2005, 7:29pm »

Press ReleaseSource:
National Center For Missing & Exploited Children

National Hotline to Locate Missing Hurricane Victims Established
Sunday September 4, 11:00 am ET
Katrina Missing Persons Hotline, 1-888-544-5475, Will Go Live at 12:00
Noon (Eastern) on Monday, September 5
ALEXANDRIA, Va., Sept. 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Department of Justice
has asked the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC)
to set up a coordinated missing persons process to locate and reunite
Hurricane Katrina victims in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama. NCMEC
staff is working through the weekend and will have the Katrina Missing
Persons Hotline, 1-888-544-5475, operational at 12:00 Noon Eastern time
on Monday, September 5, 2005. Photographs, names, and physical
descriptions of missing adults, missing children, and found children
from hurricane-stricken areas will be posted to NCMEC's web site at
www.missingkids.com.
NCMEC has also deployed representatives -- retired law enforcement
officers -- from its Team ADAM and Project ALERT programs to the states
affected to assist families with their missing persons reports. The
representatives will also provide technical resources to facilitate the
transfer of photographs and other data to NCMEC's headquarters in
Alexandria, Virginia.
NCMEC is urging media to air the missing persons flyers to aid in the
reunification efforts. Viewers may access the information on missing
persons and found children by clicking on the "Katrina Missing Persons"
graphic on NCMEC's homepage at www.missingkids.com.
In addition to the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile
Justice and Delinquency Prevention, NCMEC is working in cooperation
with
the network of state missing child clearinghouses, the Federal Bureau
of
Investigation, and other state and local law enforcement agencies. With
these partners, NCMEC will also be assisting with the identification of
unidentified deceased victims. Images of the unidentified decedents
will
be digitally-enhanced in an effort to create the best likeness that can
be shown to the public to aid in positive identifications of victims.
Long-time corporate partners of NCMEC's are providing valuable
equipment
and services to aid in this effort. Digital cameras and scanners are
being supplied by Canon U.S.A. At the request of the parent or
guardian,
Lifetouch National School Studios will be providing school photographs
of children, as possible, if no photograph is available of a missing
child. Sprint Nextel Corporation has equipped the Team ADAM and Project
ALERT representatives with cellular technology. NCMEC is grateful for
the support of these private sector partners and for the dedicated
volunteers who will be answering the Katrina Missing Persons Hotline.
Team ADAM and Project ALERT are made up of specially-trained retired
law
enforcement personnel who are available to assist law enforcement
agencies in missing child and child sexual exploitation cases.
About the National Center For Missing & Exploited Children
NCMEC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works in cooperation
with the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention. NCMEC's congressionally mandated CyberTipline,
a
reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation, has handled more
than
340,000 leads. Since its establishment in 1984, NCMEC has assisted law
enforcement with more than 116,000 missing child cases, resulting in
the
recovery of more than 94,000 children. For more information about
NCMEC,
call its toll-free, 24-hour hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit
www.missingkids.com.
Source: National Center For Missing & Exploited Children
Copyright © 2005 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved.
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xx Myspace Partners w/ NCMEC for Missing Kids
« Reply #8 on: Jan 26th, 2007, 09:08am »

Press Release


MYSPACE PARTNERS WITH THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING & EXPLOITED CHILDREN TO PROVIDE ADDED DISTRIBUTION FOR AMBER ALERTS

MySpace Users Mobilize to Help Law Enforcement Find Abducted Children Nationwide

Site Expands Safety Product Features to Heighten Safety and Security for Members Including Email Verification and “Over/ Under” Privacy Tool

LOS ANGELES—January 23, 2007—MySpace.com, the leading social networking and lifestyle portal, and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC), announced today a partnership to distribute localized online AMBER Alerts via MySpace. In addition to its traditional distribution methods, the AMBER Alert program will now benefit from the mass distribution of the MySpace network and provide rapid, viral support to law enforcement in bringing home an abducted child. The AMBER Alerts on MySpace go live today. In addition, MySpace today announced a new set of safety features to increase online safety and privacy for its community, including email verification and an “over/ under” privacy tool for all users.

”When a child is abducted, the AMBER Alert program is a tool that allows everyone to join in the search. To date 314 children have been recovered as a result of this program,” said Ernie Allen, NCMEC president and CEO. “MySpace AMBER Alerts will allow the online community to be part of a nationwide effort to bring even more children home. We are grateful that MySpace has agreed to help us distribute these important alerts.”

The AMBER Alerts on MySpace will be updated constantly. As soon as NCMEC is notified that an AMBER Alert has been issued by law enforcement, MySpace will relay that AMBER Alert information to all users within the zip codes of where the AMBER Alert was issued. The AMBER Alert notification will appear in a small text box at the top of a profile, giving users the option to receive additional information such as the photo and description of the abducted child, suspect and vehicle. Users who have information on the abducted child or the suspect’s whereabouts should immediately call 9-1-1.

“AMBER Alerts on MySpace give users nationwide the opportunity to help in the recovery of an abducted child in their area—just by logging on,” said Hemanshu Nigam, Chief Security Officer, MySpace. “We applaud NCMEC and will continue working with industry leaders such as Ernie Allen and his team to implement creative programs that share the goal of protecting teens.”

The AMBER Alert program, named for 9-year-old Amber Hagerman, who was kidnapped and murdered in Arlington, Texas, is a voluntary partnership between law-enforcement agencies, broadcasters, and transportation agencies to activate an urgent bulletin in the most serious child-abduction cases. The goal of an AMBER Alert is to instantly galvanize the entire community to assist in the search for and safe recovery of the child. Posting AMBER Alerts on MySpace uses the power of the connected community to provide rapid assistance to law enforcement in recovering an abducted child.

President Bush authorized the national AMBER Alert initiative as part of the PROTECT Act signed in 2003. The law formally established the federal government’s role in the AMBER Alert program, appointing the Department of Justice (DOJ) as the agency responsible for coordinating AMBER Alert programs on the national level. DOJ has officially partnered with NCMEC, authorizing them as the agent that coordinates and disseminates AMBER Alerts to secondary distributors such as MySpace.

"I applaud the efforts of NCMEC and MySpace to alert the public and increase awareness of AMBER Alerts," said Regina B. Schofield, Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs and the National AMBER Alert Coordinator. "This partnership expands the AMBER Alert secondary distribution network, allowing even more people to serve as the extra eyes and ears of law enforcement as they work to bring abducted children home."

Today’s announcement highlights a number of new additions to MySpace’s arsenal of user protections including mandatory email verification and an “over/ under” privacy tool. Mandatory email verification requires that all MySpace users register with a valid email address and all users creating a profile on MySpace will be required to confirm their new membership via email. The “over/under” blocking tool expands on privacy features previously available only to younger users. The over/ under blocking feature prevents users under 18 from being contacted by users over 18 and it also allows users over 18 to block users under 18 from contacting them.

Other recent privacy and security features include:

Privacy Alert: MySpace safety teams recognized that many users were misrepresenting their ages to avail themselves of privacy options exclusively given to younger users. In response, MySpace has made the full range of privacy options available to the entire community and has communicated the availability of expanded privacy options to such users. MySpace deletes an average of 25,000 profiles per week due to age misrepresentation.
Instant Messaging and Chat Safety Restrictions: Users can only receive instant messages from other users on their Friend list. Users under 18 years of age cannot access romance-specific chat rooms.
Safety Suggestion Alerts: All users under the age of 18-years old receive security warnings before they post content. MySpace encourages users of all ages to recognize the public nature of the Internet and reminds younger users to use common sense before posting content throughout the community.
Age Restrictions for Communication and Content: All younger users listed on MySpace—14- or 15-years old— are tagged to be un-searchable by age on any search engine or Internet portal. Additionally on MySpace, no user can Browse for users under 16 and adults can never add users under 16-years old as a friend unless they know the user’s last name or email address. Lastly, users 19 years or older cannot search for high school students and younger users can only receive group invites from those individuals within their friend network.
Safety and Customer Care Response:
Law enforcement hotline, 24/7 both emergency and non-emergency
Streamlined abuse reporting to better differentiate between the type of abuse
CAT team development; MySpace has created a Content Assurance Team (CAT) to assume the roles of various users and view the site ‘through their eyes’
Parent Care, dedicated parent care email and downloadable guidebook
School Care Team, dedicated educator hotline and guidebook
Primary Safety Tools for Members:
All members can set profile to “private”
Users can pre-approve all comments before being posted
Users can block another user from contacting them
Age-specific blocking capabilities available to all users
Younger user birthdays only visible to friends
MySpace “profile details” limited to age-appropriate activities for younger users
Users can conceal their ‘online now’ status
Users can prevent forwarding of their images to other sites
32,000 trained school moderators oversee forums
Users have the option to make their profile public for those in their age range
# # #

About MySpace.com
MySpace, a unit of Fox Interactive Media Inc., is the premier lifestyle portal for connecting with friends, discovering popular culture, and making a positive impact on the world. By integrating web profiles, video, mobile communications, instant messaging and more, MySpace has created a global connected community with a wide array of communication choices. As the world's top-ranked web domain in terms of page views*, MySpace is the most widely-used and highly-regarded site of its kind. MySpace’s international network includes localized community sites in the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Italy, and Ireland.

*Among the top 2000 domains comScore Media Metrix, November 2006. For more information on comScore Networks, please go to www.comscore.com.



About the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC)
NCMEC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. NCMEC’s congressionally mandated CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation, has handled more than 419,400 leads. Since 1984, NCMEC has assisted law enforcement with more than 125,200 missing child cases, resulting in the recovery of more than 107,600 children. For more information about NCMEC, call its toll-free, 24-hour hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit its web site at www.missingkids.com.


CONTACTS

MySpace
Dani Dudeck
(310) 969-7148
ddudeck@myspace.com

MySpace
Tracy Akselrud
(310) 969-2813
takselrud@myspace.com

NCMEC Communications Department
(703) 837-6111
media@ncmec.org

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